Is skewed income distribution good for environmental quality? A comparative analysis among selected BRICS countries

Is skewed income distribution good for environmental quality? A comparative analysis among... A large number of studies have examined the linkage between income inequality and environmental quality at the individual country levels. This study attempts to examine the linkage between the two factors for the individual BRICS economies from a comparative perspective, which is scarce in the literature. It examines the selected countries (Brazil, India, China and South Africa) by endogenising the patterns of primary energy consumption (coal use and petroleum use), total primary energy con- sumption, economic growth, and urbanisation as key determining factors in CO emission function. The long-run results based on ARDL bounds testing revealed that income inequality leads to increase in CO emissions for Brazil, India and China, while the same factor leads to reduction in CO emissions for South Africa. However, it observes that while coal use increases CO 2 2 emissions for India, China and South Africa, it has no effect for Brazil. In contrast, the use of petroleum products contributes to CO emissions in Brazil, while the use of the same surprisingly results in reduction of carbon emissions in South Africa, India and China. The findings suggest that given the significance of income inequality in environmental pollution, the policy makers in these emerging economies http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Is skewed income distribution good for environmental quality? A comparative analysis among selected BRICS countries

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-018-2401-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A large number of studies have examined the linkage between income inequality and environmental quality at the individual country levels. This study attempts to examine the linkage between the two factors for the individual BRICS economies from a comparative perspective, which is scarce in the literature. It examines the selected countries (Brazil, India, China and South Africa) by endogenising the patterns of primary energy consumption (coal use and petroleum use), total primary energy con- sumption, economic growth, and urbanisation as key determining factors in CO emission function. The long-run results based on ARDL bounds testing revealed that income inequality leads to increase in CO emissions for Brazil, India and China, while the same factor leads to reduction in CO emissions for South Africa. However, it observes that while coal use increases CO 2 2 emissions for India, China and South Africa, it has no effect for Brazil. In contrast, the use of petroleum products contributes to CO emissions in Brazil, while the use of the same surprisingly results in reduction of carbon emissions in South Africa, India and China. The findings suggest that given the significance of income inequality in environmental pollution, the policy makers in these emerging economies

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 3, 2018

References

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