Is pesticide sorption by constructed wetland sediments governed by water level and water dynamics?

Is pesticide sorption by constructed wetland sediments governed by water level and water dynamics? Constructed wetlands (CWs) are used to reduce the pesticide inputs from tile drainage or run-off to surface water. Their effectiveness appears variable and remains to be better characterized and understood. The aim of this study was to assess the influences of two hydraulic parameters (i.e., dynamics and water level) on the sorption process occurring in CWs. Then, two solid/liquid ratios were studied (1/1 and 1/5) to mimic the water level variation in the field, and two agitation speeds were used (none and gentle agitation) to simulate different water dynamics (stagnation and flow pass, respectively). Sorption kinetics and isotherms were obtained for four pesticides with contrasting properties. The pesticide adsorption coefficients were classified as follows: boscalid (BSC) > cyproconazole (CYP) > isoproturon (IPU) ∼ dimethachlor (DMT) at any ratio or agitation, in agreement with their water solubilities and K ow values. The effect of the solid/liquid ratio was evidenced for all conditions. Indeed, the adsorption equilibrium time was reached more quickly for the 1/1 ratio (24–72 h) than for the 1/5 ratio (96–120 h). In addition, the adsorption coefficients (K f ads) were larger for the 1/1 ratio (1.8–11.2 L kg−1) than for the 1/5 ratio (1.0–5.9 L kg−1). The agitation effect was more evidenced for the 1/5 ratio and for the more hydrophobic molecules, such as BSC and CYP, for which adsorption equilibrium time was never reached with agitation (>120 h), while it was reached at 96 h without agitation. Moreover, the K f ads values were larger with agitation than without agitation for BSC and CYP, whereas they were similar for the two agitations for IPU and DMT. Our results demonstrated that the hydrodynamic function of CWs could influence pesticide sorption with variable effects according to the molecular properties and consequently influence the mitigation effect of CWs throughout the year. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Is pesticide sorption by constructed wetland sediments governed by water level and water dynamics?

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-9123-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Constructed wetlands (CWs) are used to reduce the pesticide inputs from tile drainage or run-off to surface water. Their effectiveness appears variable and remains to be better characterized and understood. The aim of this study was to assess the influences of two hydraulic parameters (i.e., dynamics and water level) on the sorption process occurring in CWs. Then, two solid/liquid ratios were studied (1/1 and 1/5) to mimic the water level variation in the field, and two agitation speeds were used (none and gentle agitation) to simulate different water dynamics (stagnation and flow pass, respectively). Sorption kinetics and isotherms were obtained for four pesticides with contrasting properties. The pesticide adsorption coefficients were classified as follows: boscalid (BSC) > cyproconazole (CYP) > isoproturon (IPU) ∼ dimethachlor (DMT) at any ratio or agitation, in agreement with their water solubilities and K ow values. The effect of the solid/liquid ratio was evidenced for all conditions. Indeed, the adsorption equilibrium time was reached more quickly for the 1/1 ratio (24–72 h) than for the 1/5 ratio (96–120 h). In addition, the adsorption coefficients (K f ads) were larger for the 1/1 ratio (1.8–11.2 L kg−1) than for the 1/5 ratio (1.0–5.9 L kg−1). The agitation effect was more evidenced for the 1/5 ratio and for the more hydrophobic molecules, such as BSC and CYP, for which adsorption equilibrium time was never reached with agitation (>120 h), while it was reached at 96 h without agitation. Moreover, the K f ads values were larger with agitation than without agitation for BSC and CYP, whereas they were similar for the two agitations for IPU and DMT. Our results demonstrated that the hydrodynamic function of CWs could influence pesticide sorption with variable effects according to the molecular properties and consequently influence the mitigation effect of CWs throughout the year.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: May 15, 2017

References

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