Is Australian seaweed worth eating? Nutritional and sensorial properties of wild-harvested Australian versus commercially available seaweeds

Is Australian seaweed worth eating? Nutritional and sensorial properties of wild-harvested... This study aimed to determine the nutritional composition, perceived quality and palatability of nine Australian seaweeds (wild- harvested species not yet exploited for human consumption; Laurencia filiformis, Codium galeatum, Cystophora polycystidea, Cystophora torulosa, Phyllotricha decipiens, Durvillaea potatorum, Hormosira banksii, Phyllospora comosa, Ecklonia radiata), and compare them to four of the commonest commercially available species (Pyropia tenera, Sargassum fusiforme, Saccharina angustata, Undaria pinnatifida). Nutritional value varied amongst species and inconsistently with time. Four Australian species had higher total lipids than all commercial products in this study and amongst the highest values reported in the literature for seaweeds. Moreover, nine out of 13 species had an omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid ratio favourable for human health (≤ ~ 1). Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was present in higher concentrations than docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in all species. Highest DHA concentrations were found in Australian species, whilst EPA was very much higher in Pyropia tenera (nori) than all other species. Crude-fibre and protein contents were high for most Australian and commercially available species on a dry weight basis. A subset of Australian and commercially available seaweeds was prepared and cooked as soup or salad for sensorial (organoleptic) evaluation. There were no significant differences in consumer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Phycology Springer Journals

Is Australian seaweed worth eating? Nutritional and sensorial properties of wild-harvested Australian versus commercially available seaweeds

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Physiology; Ecology
ISSN
0921-8971
eISSN
1573-5176
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10811-018-1530-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the nutritional composition, perceived quality and palatability of nine Australian seaweeds (wild- harvested species not yet exploited for human consumption; Laurencia filiformis, Codium galeatum, Cystophora polycystidea, Cystophora torulosa, Phyllotricha decipiens, Durvillaea potatorum, Hormosira banksii, Phyllospora comosa, Ecklonia radiata), and compare them to four of the commonest commercially available species (Pyropia tenera, Sargassum fusiforme, Saccharina angustata, Undaria pinnatifida). Nutritional value varied amongst species and inconsistently with time. Four Australian species had higher total lipids than all commercial products in this study and amongst the highest values reported in the literature for seaweeds. Moreover, nine out of 13 species had an omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid ratio favourable for human health (≤ ~ 1). Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was present in higher concentrations than docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in all species. Highest DHA concentrations were found in Australian species, whilst EPA was very much higher in Pyropia tenera (nori) than all other species. Crude-fibre and protein contents were high for most Australian and commercially available species on a dry weight basis. A subset of Australian and commercially available seaweeds was prepared and cooked as soup or salad for sensorial (organoleptic) evaluation. There were no significant differences in consumer

Journal

Journal of Applied PhycologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 6, 2018

References

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