Is a 67-kD Cytokinin-Binding Protein from Barley and Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves Involved in the Leaf Responses to Phenylurea Derivatives? (A Review)

Is a 67-kD Cytokinin-Binding Protein from Barley and Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves Involved in the... Cytokinin-binding proteins (67-kD CBP) were isolated from barley first leaves of 8–10-day-old plants and Arabidopsis thaliana rosette leaves of 9-week-old plants. A capability of these proteins for cytokinin binding was assessed from trans-zeatin competition with antiidiotypic antibodies (ABa-i) for complex formation with immobilized 67-kD CBP under competitive ELISA conditions. ABa-i were obtained against anti-trans-zeatin antibody. 67-kD CBP from A. thaliana and barley leaves, in combination with trans-zeatin, activated transcriptional elongation in the in vitro system containing chromatin and RNA polymerase I from the same leaves. A phenylurea derivative demonstrating a high cytokinin activity, N-phenyl-N1-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)urea (4-PU-30) could not displace ABa-i from its complex with 67-kD CBP from either barley or A. thaliana leaves, which indicates the absence of its interaction with CBP. In the presence of 67-kD CBP, 4-PU-30 did not activate transcription in the in vitro system containing chromatin and RNA polymerase I from A. thaliana or barley leaves. This means that, as distinct from trans-zeatin, 4-PU-30 did not use 67-kD CBP for transcription activation. A. thaliana leaf preincubation in the 4-PU-30 solution for 1 h enhanced RNA synthesis in the transcriptional system containing chromatin and RNA polymerase I from these pretreated leaves. Thus, leaves recognized the 4-PU-30 signal using another receptor. 4-PU-30 capacity to retard leaf senescence also supports this supposition. Another highly active phenylurea derivative thidiazuron also enhanced RNA synthesis in leaves and retarded their senescence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Is a 67-kD Cytokinin-Binding Protein from Barley and Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves Involved in the Leaf Responses to Phenylurea Derivatives? (A Review)

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/lp/springer_journal/is-a-67-kd-cytokinin-binding-protein-from-barley-and-arabidopsis-uwJGAo5t4U
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:RUPP.0000047828.61196.f5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

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