Irregularity in frequency of mast seed years in Quercus floribunda a late successional species of Central Himalaya

Irregularity in frequency of mast seed years in Quercus floribunda a late successional species of... The mid altitudinal oak, Quercus floribunda forms predominantly evergreen forest in Central Himalaya between 2000–2400 m. It is late successional, mature phase species that has limited regeneration on disturbance prone sites. This oak produces mast seed crops at an interval of 2–3 years. During masting in Q. floribunda the seed fall and germination is upto ten times greater than in normal years, emphasizing the importance of mast year crop in forest maintenance. However, no mast year in this species since the last nine years (1997–2005) is a matter of serious concern. The rise in the summer and winter temperature over a period of 15 years appear to have affected the frequency of masting in this oak. The importance of masting can be adjudged from the fact that 97% of the surviving seedlings m−2 are of the mast year crop. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Ecology Springer Journals

Irregularity in frequency of mast seed years in Quercus floribunda a late successional species of Central Himalaya

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Publisher
SP MAIK Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Environment, general; Ecology
ISSN
1067-4136
eISSN
1608-3334
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1067413609070054
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The mid altitudinal oak, Quercus floribunda forms predominantly evergreen forest in Central Himalaya between 2000–2400 m. It is late successional, mature phase species that has limited regeneration on disturbance prone sites. This oak produces mast seed crops at an interval of 2–3 years. During masting in Q. floribunda the seed fall and germination is upto ten times greater than in normal years, emphasizing the importance of mast year crop in forest maintenance. However, no mast year in this species since the last nine years (1997–2005) is a matter of serious concern. The rise in the summer and winter temperature over a period of 15 years appear to have affected the frequency of masting in this oak. The importance of masting can be adjudged from the fact that 97% of the surviving seedlings m−2 are of the mast year crop.

Journal

Russian Journal of EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 15, 2009

References

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