Iron and a Man’s Reproductive Health: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Iron and a Man’s Reproductive Health: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Purpose of Review To discuss the physiologic and pathologic effects of iron on men’sreproductive health. Recent Findings Iron overload diseases are associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, infertility, and sexual dysfunction in men. Recent findings have elucidated the roles by which iron may affect the male reproductive axis. Summary Iron is requisite for life. Iron can also catalyze the production of reactive oxygen species. To maintain balance, the human body tightly regulates dietary iron absorption. Severe iron overload disorders—e.g., hereditary hemochromatosis and β- thalassemia—occur when these regulatory mechanisms are deficient. While iron is necessary, the male reproductive system is particularly sensitive to iron overload. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, infertility, and sexual dysfunction commonly occur if excess iron from iron overload disorders is not removed. The average male in the USA consumes significantly more iron than needed to replace daily losses. How this degree of iron loading may affect one’s reproductive health remains less clear, but there is evidence it may have adverse effects. . . . . . Keywords Iron overload Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism Male infertility Erectile dysfunction Oxidative stress Anejaculation Introduction dichotomy is particularly true in the male reproductive system, where a precipitous balance between sufficient and too much In the body, iron http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Urology Reports Springer Journals

Iron and a Man’s Reproductive Health: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Urology; Nephrology
ISSN
1527-2737
eISSN
1534-6285
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11934-018-0808-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review To discuss the physiologic and pathologic effects of iron on men’sreproductive health. Recent Findings Iron overload diseases are associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, infertility, and sexual dysfunction in men. Recent findings have elucidated the roles by which iron may affect the male reproductive axis. Summary Iron is requisite for life. Iron can also catalyze the production of reactive oxygen species. To maintain balance, the human body tightly regulates dietary iron absorption. Severe iron overload disorders—e.g., hereditary hemochromatosis and β- thalassemia—occur when these regulatory mechanisms are deficient. While iron is necessary, the male reproductive system is particularly sensitive to iron overload. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, infertility, and sexual dysfunction commonly occur if excess iron from iron overload disorders is not removed. The average male in the USA consumes significantly more iron than needed to replace daily losses. How this degree of iron loading may affect one’s reproductive health remains less clear, but there is evidence it may have adverse effects. . . . . . Keywords Iron overload Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism Male infertility Erectile dysfunction Oxidative stress Anejaculation Introduction dichotomy is particularly true in the male reproductive system, where a precipitous balance between sufficient and too much In the body, iron

Journal

Current Urology ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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