Involvement of nitric oxide in acquired thermotolerance of rice seedlings

Involvement of nitric oxide in acquired thermotolerance of rice seedlings The role of nitric oxide (NO) in thermotolerance acquired by heat acclimation (38°C) was investigated. Results showed that 38°C acclimation, on the one hand, obviously reduced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and MDA contents and ion leakage degree in rice leaves; however, on the other hand, it increased the survival of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings under 50°C heat stress. Application of nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), prior to 38°C acclimation dramatically increased the acquired thermotolerance. To elucidate the role of endogenous NO in acquired thermotolerance, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO, a specific NO scavenger) was used (scavengers are used to control the level of both exogenous and endogenous NO). Results showed that PTIO pretreatment resulted in the elimination of acquired thermotolerance induced by 38°C acclimation in rice seedlings. Nitric oxide (NO) release measurement indicated that there was indeed an abrupt elevation in the NO content in 40 min after 38°C acclimation, proving the involvement of NO in acquired thermotolerance inducement in rice seedling. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Involvement of nitric oxide in acquired thermotolerance of rice seedlings

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Physiology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443713060149
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The role of nitric oxide (NO) in thermotolerance acquired by heat acclimation (38°C) was investigated. Results showed that 38°C acclimation, on the one hand, obviously reduced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and MDA contents and ion leakage degree in rice leaves; however, on the other hand, it increased the survival of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings under 50°C heat stress. Application of nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), prior to 38°C acclimation dramatically increased the acquired thermotolerance. To elucidate the role of endogenous NO in acquired thermotolerance, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO, a specific NO scavenger) was used (scavengers are used to control the level of both exogenous and endogenous NO). Results showed that PTIO pretreatment resulted in the elimination of acquired thermotolerance induced by 38°C acclimation in rice seedlings. Nitric oxide (NO) release measurement indicated that there was indeed an abrupt elevation in the NO content in 40 min after 38°C acclimation, proving the involvement of NO in acquired thermotolerance inducement in rice seedling.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2013

References

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