Introduction

Introduction P1: FhN/FZI P2: GAR Psychiatric Quarterly [psaq] PH015-294623 April 28, 2001 14:35 Style file version Nov. 19th, 1999 Psychiatric Quarterly, Vol. 72, No. 2, 2001 Special Section Bipolar Illness and Society Rif S. El-Mallakh, M.D., Guest Editor Bipolar disorder, or manic-depression, is a heritable severe psychiatric condition. In its severe form, type I illness, it affects approximately 1% of humanity. The milder form, type II illness, affects another 1–2%. In the United States about 5 million people have bipolar disorder. As many as three million of these individuals do not get treated for this illness. While manic-depression is defined as a disease of an individual, it ac- tually has tremendous impact on a much larger sphere. Clearly manic depression affects the family, the work place, and society in several ways. In September of 1999, the University of Louisville’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine devoted the Fifth Annual Bipo- lar Symposium to understanding the interaction of manic-depression and society. Perhaps the greatest impact of bipolar illness is on the people imme- diately surrounding the affected individual. Due to frequently impaired insight in afflicted subjects, the familial impact may exceed the personal impact on the patient. The effect of bipolar http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Introduction

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1010388108204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

P1: FhN/FZI P2: GAR Psychiatric Quarterly [psaq] PH015-294623 April 28, 2001 14:35 Style file version Nov. 19th, 1999 Psychiatric Quarterly, Vol. 72, No. 2, 2001 Special Section Bipolar Illness and Society Rif S. El-Mallakh, M.D., Guest Editor Bipolar disorder, or manic-depression, is a heritable severe psychiatric condition. In its severe form, type I illness, it affects approximately 1% of humanity. The milder form, type II illness, affects another 1–2%. In the United States about 5 million people have bipolar disorder. As many as three million of these individuals do not get treated for this illness. While manic-depression is defined as a disease of an individual, it ac- tually has tremendous impact on a much larger sphere. Clearly manic depression affects the family, the work place, and society in several ways. In September of 1999, the University of Louisville’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine devoted the Fifth Annual Bipo- lar Symposium to understanding the interaction of manic-depression and society. Perhaps the greatest impact of bipolar illness is on the people imme- diately surrounding the affected individual. Due to frequently impaired insight in afflicted subjects, the familial impact may exceed the personal impact on the patient. The effect of bipolar

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

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