Intracohort cannibalism and methods for its mitigation in cultured freshwater fish

Intracohort cannibalism and methods for its mitigation in cultured freshwater fish Cannibalism is a common phenomenon that occurs in over 30 fish families. Most of the species are valuable objects of aquaculture and cannibalism is highly undesirable. Cannibalism is an aggressive behaviour, which can be caused by stress induced by various population and environmental factors and can occur in two main forms: early larval and late juvenile (or adult). Each of these forms can lead to severe losses of stock. Losses are caused not only by fish eating each other, but also by an increase in the number of infections (the result of body surface damage). It is important to understand the phenomenon of cannibalism in order to properly prevent, diagnose and reduce it. The main aim of this study was to present and examine some of the well-examined methods of cannibalism mitigation. Most of the methods consist of creating rearing conditions similar to natural conditions and to reduce stress. Moreover, because of large interspecies differences, similar methods can result in different effects depending on the species. Additional studies are needed to better understand the biology of each cultured species with particular emphasis on the impact of domestication, as well as to improve fish rearing conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Intracohort cannibalism and methods for its mitigation in cultured freshwater fish

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-017-9465-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cannibalism is a common phenomenon that occurs in over 30 fish families. Most of the species are valuable objects of aquaculture and cannibalism is highly undesirable. Cannibalism is an aggressive behaviour, which can be caused by stress induced by various population and environmental factors and can occur in two main forms: early larval and late juvenile (or adult). Each of these forms can lead to severe losses of stock. Losses are caused not only by fish eating each other, but also by an increase in the number of infections (the result of body surface damage). It is important to understand the phenomenon of cannibalism in order to properly prevent, diagnose and reduce it. The main aim of this study was to present and examine some of the well-examined methods of cannibalism mitigation. Most of the methods consist of creating rearing conditions similar to natural conditions and to reduce stress. Moreover, because of large interspecies differences, similar methods can result in different effects depending on the species. Additional studies are needed to better understand the biology of each cultured species with particular emphasis on the impact of domestication, as well as to improve fish rearing conditions.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 18, 2017

References

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