Internet Searching and Memory Processing During a Recollection fMRI Task: Evidence from Pseudo Recollected Trials

Internet Searching and Memory Processing During a Recollection fMRI Task: Evidence from Pseudo... The advent and widespread use of Internet searching has changed ways in which individuals find and store information. In this study, we sought to explore the relationships between Internet searching and memory processes by comparing items that individuals “remember” or “believe they remember” (Remember-Incorrect) in Internet-based versus book-based information acquisition groups. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), Internet searching was associated with lower brain activations in the bilateral middle/superior temporal gyrus, right fusiform gyrus, and right lentiform nucleus during “Remember-Incorrect” trials, particularly in the Internet-searching group. Positive correlations were found between brain activations and response times during the “Remember-Incorrect” trials. Taken together, data suggest that Internet-based searching was related to making more incorrect responses that were associated with relatively blunted brain activations in regions previously implicated in recollection and memory processing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science Springer Journals

Internet Searching and Memory Processing During a Recollection fMRI Task: Evidence from Pseudo Recollected Trials

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing
Subject
Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Psychiatry; Social Work and Community Development
eISSN
2366-5963
D.O.I.
10.1007/s41347-016-0002-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The advent and widespread use of Internet searching has changed ways in which individuals find and store information. In this study, we sought to explore the relationships between Internet searching and memory processes by comparing items that individuals “remember” or “believe they remember” (Remember-Incorrect) in Internet-based versus book-based information acquisition groups. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), Internet searching was associated with lower brain activations in the bilateral middle/superior temporal gyrus, right fusiform gyrus, and right lentiform nucleus during “Remember-Incorrect” trials, particularly in the Internet-searching group. Positive correlations were found between brain activations and response times during the “Remember-Incorrect” trials. Taken together, data suggest that Internet-based searching was related to making more incorrect responses that were associated with relatively blunted brain activations in regions previously implicated in recollection and memory processing.

Journal

Journal of Technology in Behavioral ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 11, 2017

References

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