International Practices to Protect the Geostationary Ring

International Practices to Protect the Geostationary Ring Since more than 20 years reorbiting of geostationary satellites at the end of their mission is recommended and partially performed to protect the GEO environment. Now a worldwide accepted reorbiting altitude was defined by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). Still only one-third of the aging satellites follow this IADC rule. Based on orbital data in the DISCOS database, the situation in the geostationary ring is analyzed. From 878 known objects, 305 are controlled inside their longitude slots, 353 are drifting above, below or through GEO, and 125 are in a libration orbit (status of January 2001). In the last four years (1997–2000) 58 spacecraft reached end-of-life. Twenty of them were reorbited in compliance with the IADC recommendations, 16 were reorbited below this recommendation and 22 were abandoned without any end-of-life disposal manoeuvre. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Space Debris Springer Journals

International Practices to Protect the Geostationary Ring

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Engineering; Automotive Engineering; Law of the Sea, Air and Outer Space; Astronomy, Observations and Techniques
ISSN
1388-3828
eISSN
1572-9664
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1013328515023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since more than 20 years reorbiting of geostationary satellites at the end of their mission is recommended and partially performed to protect the GEO environment. Now a worldwide accepted reorbiting altitude was defined by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). Still only one-third of the aging satellites follow this IADC rule. Based on orbital data in the DISCOS database, the situation in the geostationary ring is analyzed. From 878 known objects, 305 are controlled inside their longitude slots, 353 are drifting above, below or through GEO, and 125 are in a libration orbit (status of January 2001). In the last four years (1997–2000) 58 spacecraft reached end-of-life. Twenty of them were reorbited in compliance with the IADC recommendations, 16 were reorbited below this recommendation and 22 were abandoned without any end-of-life disposal manoeuvre.

Journal

Space DebrisSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 30, 2004

References

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