Inter-individual variation in health and disease associated with pulmonary infectious agents

Inter-individual variation in health and disease associated with pulmonary infectious agents Respiratory infectious diseases resulting from bacterial or viral pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), or influenza, are major global public health concerns. Lower respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity and mortality, only behind ischemic heart disease and stroke (GBD 2015 LRI Collaborators in Lancet Infect Dis 17(11):1133–1161, 2017). Developing countries are particularly impacted by these diseases. However, while many are infected with viruses such as RSV (> 90% of all individuals are infected by age 2), only sub-populations develop severe disease. Many factors may contribute to the inter-individual variation in response to respiratory infections, including gender, age, socioeconomic status, nutrition, and genetic background. Association studies with functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in biologically plausible gene candidates have been performed in human populations to provide insight to the molecular genetic contribution to pulmonary infections and disease severity. In vitro cell models and genome-wide association studies in animal models of genetic susceptibility to respiratory infections have also identified novel candidate susceptibility genes, some of which have also been found to contribute to disease susceptibility in human populations. Genetic background may also contribute to differential efficacy of vaccines against respiratory infections. Development of new genetic mouse models such as the collaborative cross and diversity outbred mice should provide additional insight to the mechanisms of genetic susceptibility to respiratory infections. Continued investigation of susceptibility factors should provide insight to novel strategies to prevent and treat disease that contributes to global morbidity and mortality attributed to respiratory infections. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Inter-individual variation in health and disease associated with pulmonary infectious agents

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-018-9733-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Respiratory infectious diseases resulting from bacterial or viral pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), or influenza, are major global public health concerns. Lower respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity and mortality, only behind ischemic heart disease and stroke (GBD 2015 LRI Collaborators in Lancet Infect Dis 17(11):1133–1161, 2017). Developing countries are particularly impacted by these diseases. However, while many are infected with viruses such as RSV (> 90% of all individuals are infected by age 2), only sub-populations develop severe disease. Many factors may contribute to the inter-individual variation in response to respiratory infections, including gender, age, socioeconomic status, nutrition, and genetic background. Association studies with functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in biologically plausible gene candidates have been performed in human populations to provide insight to the molecular genetic contribution to pulmonary infections and disease severity. In vitro cell models and genome-wide association studies in animal models of genetic susceptibility to respiratory infections have also identified novel candidate susceptibility genes, some of which have also been found to contribute to disease susceptibility in human populations. Genetic background may also contribute to differential efficacy of vaccines against respiratory infections. Development of new genetic mouse models such as the collaborative cross and diversity outbred mice should provide additional insight to the mechanisms of genetic susceptibility to respiratory infections. Continued investigation of susceptibility factors should provide insight to novel strategies to prevent and treat disease that contributes to global morbidity and mortality attributed to respiratory infections.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 20, 2018

References

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