Intellectuals and the Politics of Style

Intellectuals and the Politics of Style This article addresses the characteristic styles and modes of self-presentation used by such Victorian public moralists and intellectuals as William Morris, John Ruskin and Matthew Arnold in both their writing and in their appearances as public lecturers: these were all interventions that were aimed at provoking an audience into intellectual consideration and self-reflection. The article examines how questions about the style of these figures have shaped the response to their work both at the time and in the years since their deaths; thinking about why, in Raymond Williams’s words, they have produced ‘mixed feelings of respect and suspicion’. It considers how their versions of the combination of intellectual and public life could be thought about in our post-financial crisis present, at a moment when late nineteenth century debates about ‘the elites and the masses’ are re-emerging, but where also the figure of the intellectual is taking on a renewed interest as one possible point of encounter between these forces. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society" Springer Journals

Intellectuals and the Politics of Style

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by The Author(s)
Subject
Social Sciences; Sociology, general; Clinical Psychology; Personality and Social Psychology
ISSN
0891-4486
eISSN
1573-3416
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10767-016-9231-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article addresses the characteristic styles and modes of self-presentation used by such Victorian public moralists and intellectuals as William Morris, John Ruskin and Matthew Arnold in both their writing and in their appearances as public lecturers: these were all interventions that were aimed at provoking an audience into intellectual consideration and self-reflection. The article examines how questions about the style of these figures have shaped the response to their work both at the time and in the years since their deaths; thinking about why, in Raymond Williams’s words, they have produced ‘mixed feelings of respect and suspicion’. It considers how their versions of the combination of intellectual and public life could be thought about in our post-financial crisis present, at a moment when late nineteenth century debates about ‘the elites and the masses’ are re-emerging, but where also the figure of the intellectual is taking on a renewed interest as one possible point of encounter between these forces.

Journal

"International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society"Springer Journals

Published: Aug 20, 2016

References

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