Infrared thermography investigations in transitional supersonic boundary layers

Infrared thermography investigations in transitional supersonic boundary layers The study of boundary-layer transition in supersonic flows is conducted employing infrared thermography (IRT). Several models of swept wings are tested in a blow-down facility at Mach number 2.4. The effects of wing sweep and other parameters (angle of attack, leading-edge contour, presence/absence of surface roughness) are successfully observed. The transition front is clearly identified, demonstrating the utility of IRT for this type of study. The technique is particularly indicated for flows that are sensitive to surface alterations (roughness), such as transitional boundary layers, because it does not require interaction with the model or the flow under investigation. The additional advantage of no need for special apparatus, except for the infrared camera, makes IRT well suited for both wind-tunnel and in-flight testing. Practical problems and limitations encountered when dealing with IRT in high-speed flows are also discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experiments in Fluids Springer Journals

Infrared thermography investigations in transitional supersonic boundary layers

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Engineering; Engineering Fluid Dynamics; Fluid- and Aerodynamics; Engineering Thermodynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer
ISSN
0723-4864
eISSN
1432-1114
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00348-007-0384-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The study of boundary-layer transition in supersonic flows is conducted employing infrared thermography (IRT). Several models of swept wings are tested in a blow-down facility at Mach number 2.4. The effects of wing sweep and other parameters (angle of attack, leading-edge contour, presence/absence of surface roughness) are successfully observed. The transition front is clearly identified, demonstrating the utility of IRT for this type of study. The technique is particularly indicated for flows that are sensitive to surface alterations (roughness), such as transitional boundary layers, because it does not require interaction with the model or the flow under investigation. The additional advantage of no need for special apparatus, except for the infrared camera, makes IRT well suited for both wind-tunnel and in-flight testing. Practical problems and limitations encountered when dealing with IRT in high-speed flows are also discussed.

Journal

Experiments in FluidsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 9, 2007

References

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