Infrared study of UV-irradiated tungsten trioxide powders containing adsorbed dimethyl methyl phosphonate and trimethyl phosphate

Infrared study of UV-irradiated tungsten trioxide powders containing adsorbed dimethyl methyl... The photodecomposition of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and trimethyl phosphate (TMP) adsorbed on monoclinic WO3 powders when irradiated by ultraviolet light (UV) in air, oxygen, and under evacuation was investigated using infrared spectroscopy (IR). The IR spectra show that DMMP decomposes into methyl phosphonate upon exposure to 254 nm UV for 2 h at room temperature in air. The same decomposition of DMMP occurs only at temperatures above 300°C without UV illumination. TMP differs from DMMP in that the photodecomposition product is not the same as the decomposition product obtained by heating above 300°C. Thermal decomposition leads to formation of a phosphate on the surface, whereas photodecomposition leads to the same adsorbed methyl phosphonate as found for the thermal or photodecomposition of DMMP. Since TMP does not contain a P-CH3 bond, the formation of a methyl phosphonate on the surface after UV illumination involves a mechanism where CH3 groups migrate from the methoxy group to the phosphorous central atom. No decomposition is observed at room temperature when DMMP or TMP adsorbed on WO3 is irradiated under vacuum or in nitrogen atmosphere. Therefore, the photodecomposition of either DMMP or TMP adsorbed on WO3 at room temperature does not involve a reaction with the lattice oxygen but rather a reaction with the oxygen radicals produced by the decomposition of ozone. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research on Chemical Intermediates Springer Journals

Infrared study of UV-irradiated tungsten trioxide powders containing adsorbed dimethyl methyl phosphonate and trimethyl phosphate

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Publisher
Brill Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by VSP
Subject
Chemistry; Inorganic Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Catalysis
ISSN
0922-6168
eISSN
1568-5675
D.O.I.
10.1163/156856706778400280
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The photodecomposition of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and trimethyl phosphate (TMP) adsorbed on monoclinic WO3 powders when irradiated by ultraviolet light (UV) in air, oxygen, and under evacuation was investigated using infrared spectroscopy (IR). The IR spectra show that DMMP decomposes into methyl phosphonate upon exposure to 254 nm UV for 2 h at room temperature in air. The same decomposition of DMMP occurs only at temperatures above 300°C without UV illumination. TMP differs from DMMP in that the photodecomposition product is not the same as the decomposition product obtained by heating above 300°C. Thermal decomposition leads to formation of a phosphate on the surface, whereas photodecomposition leads to the same adsorbed methyl phosphonate as found for the thermal or photodecomposition of DMMP. Since TMP does not contain a P-CH3 bond, the formation of a methyl phosphonate on the surface after UV illumination involves a mechanism where CH3 groups migrate from the methoxy group to the phosphorous central atom. No decomposition is observed at room temperature when DMMP or TMP adsorbed on WO3 is irradiated under vacuum or in nitrogen atmosphere. Therefore, the photodecomposition of either DMMP or TMP adsorbed on WO3 at room temperature does not involve a reaction with the lattice oxygen but rather a reaction with the oxygen radicals produced by the decomposition of ozone.

Journal

Research on Chemical IntermediatesSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2006

References

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