Influence of septic system wastewater treatment on titanium dioxide nanoparticle subsurface transport mechanisms

Influence of septic system wastewater treatment on titanium dioxide nanoparticle subsurface... Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are commonly incorporated into food and consumer applications to enhance a specific product aspect (i.e., optical properties). Life cycle analyses revealed ENMs can be released from products during usage and reach wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), with titanium dioxide (TiO ) accounting for a large fraction. As such, food grade (FG) TiO , a more common form of TiO in wastewater, was used in this study. Nanomaterials in WWTPs have been well 2 2 characterized, although the problematic septic system has been neglected. Elution and bioaccumulation of TiO ENMs from WTTPs in downriver sediments and microorganisms has been observed; however, little is known about mechanisms governing the elution of FG TiO from the septic drainage system. This study characterized the transport behavior and mechanisms of FG TiO particles in porous media conditions after septic waste treatment. FG and industrial grade (IG) TiO (more commonly 2 2 studied) were introduced to septic tank effluent and low-ionic strength electrolyte solutions prior to column transport experi- ments. Results indicate that FG TiO aggregate size (200–400 nm) remained consistent across solutions. Additionally, elution of FG and IG TiO was greatest in septic effluent at the higher nanoparticle concentration (100 ppm). FG http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Springer Journals

Influence of septic system wastewater treatment on titanium dioxide nanoparticle subsurface transport mechanisms

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Analytical Chemistry; Biochemistry, general; Laboratory Medicine; Characterization and Evaluation of Materials; Food Science; Monitoring/Environmental Analysis
ISSN
1618-2642
eISSN
1618-2650
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00216-018-1136-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are commonly incorporated into food and consumer applications to enhance a specific product aspect (i.e., optical properties). Life cycle analyses revealed ENMs can be released from products during usage and reach wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), with titanium dioxide (TiO ) accounting for a large fraction. As such, food grade (FG) TiO , a more common form of TiO in wastewater, was used in this study. Nanomaterials in WWTPs have been well 2 2 characterized, although the problematic septic system has been neglected. Elution and bioaccumulation of TiO ENMs from WTTPs in downriver sediments and microorganisms has been observed; however, little is known about mechanisms governing the elution of FG TiO from the septic drainage system. This study characterized the transport behavior and mechanisms of FG TiO particles in porous media conditions after septic waste treatment. FG and industrial grade (IG) TiO (more commonly 2 2 studied) were introduced to septic tank effluent and low-ionic strength electrolyte solutions prior to column transport experi- ments. Results indicate that FG TiO aggregate size (200–400 nm) remained consistent across solutions. Additionally, elution of FG and IG TiO was greatest in septic effluent at the higher nanoparticle concentration (100 ppm). FG

Journal

Analytical and Bioanalytical ChemistrySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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