Infant Mortality and Socioeconomic Status: New Bottle, Same Old Wine

Infant Mortality and Socioeconomic Status: New Bottle, Same Old Wine This paper presents the results of an ecological analysis of the relationship between infant mortality and economic status in metropolitan Ohio for the period 1960–2000. The data examined are centered on the five censuses undertaken during this 40-year period. The basic unit of analysis is the census tract of mother’s usual residence, with economic status being determined by the percentage of low income families living in each tract. For each of the five periods covered, census tracts were aggregated into broad income areas and three-year average infant mortality rates were computed for each area, by age, sex, race and exogenous-endogenous causes of death. The most important conclusion to be drawn from the data is that in spite of some very remarkable declines in infant mortality at all class levels since 1960, there continues to be a very clear and pronounced inverse association between income status and infant mortality. Indeed, the evidence indicates that the relationship has become stronger over the years. These observations are applicable for both sexes, for whites and nonwhites, for neonatal and postneonatal deaths, and for both major cause of death groups. It is concluded that while public health programs are important, any progress in narrowing this long-standing differential is unlikely unless ways can be found to enhance the economic well-being of the lower socioeconomic groups. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Infant Mortality and Socioeconomic Status: New Bottle, Same Old Wine

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Geography; Economic Policy; Population Economics; Demography
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11113-005-0088-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper presents the results of an ecological analysis of the relationship between infant mortality and economic status in metropolitan Ohio for the period 1960–2000. The data examined are centered on the five censuses undertaken during this 40-year period. The basic unit of analysis is the census tract of mother’s usual residence, with economic status being determined by the percentage of low income families living in each tract. For each of the five periods covered, census tracts were aggregated into broad income areas and three-year average infant mortality rates were computed for each area, by age, sex, race and exogenous-endogenous causes of death. The most important conclusion to be drawn from the data is that in spite of some very remarkable declines in infant mortality at all class levels since 1960, there continues to be a very clear and pronounced inverse association between income status and infant mortality. Indeed, the evidence indicates that the relationship has become stronger over the years. These observations are applicable for both sexes, for whites and nonwhites, for neonatal and postneonatal deaths, and for both major cause of death groups. It is concluded that while public health programs are important, any progress in narrowing this long-standing differential is unlikely unless ways can be found to enhance the economic well-being of the lower socioeconomic groups.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 22, 2005

References

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