Induction of glycyrrhizin and total phenolic compound production in licorice by using arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

Induction of glycyrrhizin and total phenolic compound production in licorice by using arbuscular... Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have mutualistic symbiosis with higher plants, increasing plant resistance to environmental stresses and nutrient uptake and improving soil. During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, a range of chemical and biological factors are affected. In this study, two species of arbuscular mycorrhiza (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices) were used to assess the effects of inoculation on licorice growth and secondary metabolite production. After successful inoculation, the increase in the growth rate, P and Zn uptake, and the accumulation of secondary metabolites in licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) roots were observed in two periods of 3 and 6 months compared to control. After 6 months, more increments in growth, secondary metabolites, and P and Zn uptake were observed compared with the first 3-months period. Two groups of secondary metabolites arising from phenolic and terpenoid metabolism obviously responded to mycorrhizal fungi colonization in licorice roots. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Induction of glycyrrhizin and total phenolic compound production in licorice by using arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Physiology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443713050129
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have mutualistic symbiosis with higher plants, increasing plant resistance to environmental stresses and nutrient uptake and improving soil. During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, a range of chemical and biological factors are affected. In this study, two species of arbuscular mycorrhiza (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices) were used to assess the effects of inoculation on licorice growth and secondary metabolite production. After successful inoculation, the increase in the growth rate, P and Zn uptake, and the accumulation of secondary metabolites in licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) roots were observed in two periods of 3 and 6 months compared to control. After 6 months, more increments in growth, secondary metabolites, and P and Zn uptake were observed compared with the first 3-months period. Two groups of secondary metabolites arising from phenolic and terpenoid metabolism obviously responded to mycorrhizal fungi colonization in licorice roots.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2013

References

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