Increased valgus laxity in flexion with greater tibial resection depth following total knee arthroplasty

Increased valgus laxity in flexion with greater tibial resection depth following total knee... Purpose Soft tissue balancing is of central importance to outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, there are lack of data analysing the effect of tibial bone cut thickness on valgus laxity. A cadaveric study was undertaken to assess the biomechanical consequences of tibial resection depth on through range knee joint valgus stability. We aimed to establish a maximum tibial resection depth, beyond which medial collateral ligament balancing becomes challenging, and a constrained implant should be considered. Methods Eleven cadaveric specimens were included for analysis. The biomechanical effects of increasing tibial resection were studied, with bone cuts made at 6, 10, 14, 18 and 24 mm from the lateral tibial articular surface. A computer naviga- tion system was used to perform the tibial resection and to measure the valgus laxity resulting from a torque of 10 Nm. Measurements were taken in four knee positions: 0° or extension, 30°, 60° and 90° of flexion. Intra-observer reliability was assessed. A minimum sample size of eight cadavers was necessary. Statistical analysis was performed using a nonparametric Spearman’s ranking correlation matrix at the different stages: in extension, at 30°, 60° and 90° of knee flexion. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results There was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy Springer Journals

Increased valgus laxity in flexion with greater tibial resection depth following total knee arthroplasty

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery, Arthroscopy (ESSKA)
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Orthopedics
ISSN
0942-2056
eISSN
1433-7347
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00167-018-4988-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Soft tissue balancing is of central importance to outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, there are lack of data analysing the effect of tibial bone cut thickness on valgus laxity. A cadaveric study was undertaken to assess the biomechanical consequences of tibial resection depth on through range knee joint valgus stability. We aimed to establish a maximum tibial resection depth, beyond which medial collateral ligament balancing becomes challenging, and a constrained implant should be considered. Methods Eleven cadaveric specimens were included for analysis. The biomechanical effects of increasing tibial resection were studied, with bone cuts made at 6, 10, 14, 18 and 24 mm from the lateral tibial articular surface. A computer naviga- tion system was used to perform the tibial resection and to measure the valgus laxity resulting from a torque of 10 Nm. Measurements were taken in four knee positions: 0° or extension, 30°, 60° and 90° of flexion. Intra-observer reliability was assessed. A minimum sample size of eight cadavers was necessary. Statistical analysis was performed using a nonparametric Spearman’s ranking correlation matrix at the different stages: in extension, at 30°, 60° and 90° of knee flexion. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results There was

Journal

Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, ArthroscopySpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References

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