Increased perirenal fat area is not associated with adverse outcomes after laparoscopic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

Increased perirenal fat area is not associated with adverse outcomes after laparoscopic total... Introduction Intraabdominal visceral obesity may increase tech- of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing laparoscopic rec- nical challenges during laparoscopic rectal resection and hypo- tal cancer surgery. thetically therefore increase the risk of perioperative complica- tions. The aim of this study was to analyze intraabdominal obe- . . . sity by means of perirenal fat against risk of adverse outcomes in Keywords Rectal cancer Perirenal fat Visceral obesity patients undergoing laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. Morbidity Methods This study was a single-institution retrospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic total mesorectal surgery for rectal cancer between January 2009 and January 2013. Abdominal CTscans with intravenous con- Introduction trast were assessed in a blinded manner to estimate the perirenal fat area (cm ). Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery may be technically chal- Result A total of 195 patients were included (median age lenging especially in obese patients with a narrow pelvis [1]. 70 years (range 27–87), 58 women and 137 men) for analysis. Massive intraabdominal visceral obesity can make the surgical There was a moderate correlation between BMI and perirenal dissection more difficult and has been suggested as a risk fat area (r = 0.499, p = 0.001). Perirenal fat area was not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery Springer Journals

Increased perirenal fat area is not associated with adverse outcomes after laparoscopic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; General Surgery; Abdominal Surgery; Cardiac Surgery; Thoracic Surgery; Traumatic Surgery; Vascular Surgery
ISSN
1435-2443
eISSN
1435-2451
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00423-017-1636-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Intraabdominal visceral obesity may increase tech- of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing laparoscopic rec- nical challenges during laparoscopic rectal resection and hypo- tal cancer surgery. thetically therefore increase the risk of perioperative complica- tions. The aim of this study was to analyze intraabdominal obe- . . . sity by means of perirenal fat against risk of adverse outcomes in Keywords Rectal cancer Perirenal fat Visceral obesity patients undergoing laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. Morbidity Methods This study was a single-institution retrospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic total mesorectal surgery for rectal cancer between January 2009 and January 2013. Abdominal CTscans with intravenous con- Introduction trast were assessed in a blinded manner to estimate the perirenal fat area (cm ). Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery may be technically chal- Result A total of 195 patients were included (median age lenging especially in obese patients with a narrow pelvis [1]. 70 years (range 27–87), 58 women and 137 men) for analysis. Massive intraabdominal visceral obesity can make the surgical There was a moderate correlation between BMI and perirenal dissection more difficult and has been suggested as a risk fat area (r = 0.499, p = 0.001). Perirenal fat area was not

Journal

Langenbeck's Archives of SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 7, 2017

References

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