Income, Race, and Infant Mortality: Comment on Stockwell Et al.

Income, Race, and Infant Mortality: Comment on Stockwell Et al. Population Research and Policy Review (2005) 24: 405–409  Springer 2005 DOI 10.1007/s11113-005-0089-1 ROBERT A. HUMMER Population Research Center and Department of Sociology, University of Texas at Austin Health disparities are at the heart of the nation’s public policy agenda. The Healthy People 2010 Report (U. S. Department of Health and Human Services 2000: 1) includes as one of its two key goals to ‘‘eliminate health disparities’’ by the end of this decade. Opening up any journal today in public health, and to a growing extent, demography will undoubtedly result in articles addressing health disparities across socioeconomic and race/ethnic subgroups of the population. There are conferences that are specifically devoted to health disparities, funding mechanisms geared toward research on health disparities, and academic programs and even departments that are built around researching and teaching about health disparities. In short, academic and public policy interest is very strong. In comparison to a great deal of the above-mentioned interest that is relatively recent in origin, Ed Stockwell and colleagues at Bowling Green State University have been researching health disparities – in their case focusing on infant mortality in the state of Ohio – for several decades. The Stockwell et al. paper http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Income, Race, and Infant Mortality: Comment on Stockwell Et al.

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Geography; Economic Policy; Population Economics; Demography
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11113-005-0089-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Population Research and Policy Review (2005) 24: 405–409  Springer 2005 DOI 10.1007/s11113-005-0089-1 ROBERT A. HUMMER Population Research Center and Department of Sociology, University of Texas at Austin Health disparities are at the heart of the nation’s public policy agenda. The Healthy People 2010 Report (U. S. Department of Health and Human Services 2000: 1) includes as one of its two key goals to ‘‘eliminate health disparities’’ by the end of this decade. Opening up any journal today in public health, and to a growing extent, demography will undoubtedly result in articles addressing health disparities across socioeconomic and race/ethnic subgroups of the population. There are conferences that are specifically devoted to health disparities, funding mechanisms geared toward research on health disparities, and academic programs and even departments that are built around researching and teaching about health disparities. In short, academic and public policy interest is very strong. In comparison to a great deal of the above-mentioned interest that is relatively recent in origin, Ed Stockwell and colleagues at Bowling Green State University have been researching health disparities – in their case focusing on infant mortality in the state of Ohio – for several decades. The Stockwell et al. paper

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 22, 2005

References

  • The first injustice: Socioeconomic disparities, health services technology, and infant mortality
    Gortmaker, S. L.; Wise, P. H.

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