Importance of the cultivation history for the response of Escherichia coli to oscillations in scale-down experiments

Importance of the cultivation history for the response of Escherichia coli to oscillations in... Large-scale bioreactors are inhomogeneous systems, in which the fluid phase expresses concentration gradients. They depend on the mass transfer and fluid dynamics in the reactor, the feeding strategy, the cell-specific substrate uptake parameters, and the cell density. As high cell densities are only obtained at low specific growth rates, it is necessary to investigate the cellular responses to oscillations in particular under such conditions, an issue which is mostly neglected. Instead, the feed oscillations are often started directly after the batch phase, when the specific growth rate is close to the maximum. We show here that the cultivation mode before oscillations are started has a tremendous effect on the metabolic responses. In difference to cells, which were pre-grown under batch conditions at a high growth rate, Escherichia coli cells that were pre-grown under glucose limitation at a low growth rate accumulate short-chain fatty acids (acetate, lactate, succinate) and glycolysis-related amino acids to a higher extent in a two-compartment scale-down bioreactor. Thus, cells which enter oscillations from a lower specific growth rate seem to react more sensitive to oscillations than cells that are subjected to oscillations directly after a batch phase. These results are interesting in designing reliable scale-down systems, which better reflect large-scale bioprocesses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering Springer Journals

Importance of the cultivation history for the response of Escherichia coli to oscillations in scale-down experiments

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Biotechnology; Industrial and Production Engineering; Environmental Engineering/Biotechnology; Industrial Chemistry/Chemical Engineering; Food Science
ISSN
1615-7591
eISSN
1615-7605
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00449-018-1958-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Large-scale bioreactors are inhomogeneous systems, in which the fluid phase expresses concentration gradients. They depend on the mass transfer and fluid dynamics in the reactor, the feeding strategy, the cell-specific substrate uptake parameters, and the cell density. As high cell densities are only obtained at low specific growth rates, it is necessary to investigate the cellular responses to oscillations in particular under such conditions, an issue which is mostly neglected. Instead, the feed oscillations are often started directly after the batch phase, when the specific growth rate is close to the maximum. We show here that the cultivation mode before oscillations are started has a tremendous effect on the metabolic responses. In difference to cells, which were pre-grown under batch conditions at a high growth rate, Escherichia coli cells that were pre-grown under glucose limitation at a low growth rate accumulate short-chain fatty acids (acetate, lactate, succinate) and glycolysis-related amino acids to a higher extent in a two-compartment scale-down bioreactor. Thus, cells which enter oscillations from a lower specific growth rate seem to react more sensitive to oscillations than cells that are subjected to oscillations directly after a batch phase. These results are interesting in designing reliable scale-down systems, which better reflect large-scale bioprocesses.

Journal

Bioprocess and Biosystems EngineeringSpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2018

References

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