Implications of oxidative stress on viral pathogenesis

Implications of oxidative stress on viral pathogenesis Reactive species are frequently formed after viral infections. Antioxidant defences, including enzymatic and non-enzymatic components, protect against reactive species, but sometimes these defences are not completely adequate. An imbalance in the production of reactive species and the body’s inability to detoxify these reactive species is referred to as oxidative stress. The aim of this review is to analyse the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of viral infections and highlight some major therapeutic approaches that have gained importance, with regards to controlling virus-induced oxidative injury. Attention will be focused on DNA viruses (papillomaviruses, hepadnaviruses), RNA viruses (flaviviruses, orthomyxoviruses, paramyxoviruses, togaviruses) and retroviruses (human immunodeficiency virus). In general, viruses cause an imbalance in the cellular redox environment, which depending on the virus and the cell can result in different responses, e.g. cell signaling, antioxidant defences, reactive species, and other processes. Therefore, the modulation of reactive species production and oxidative stress potentially represents a novel pharmacological approach for reducing the consequences of viral pathogenesis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Implications of oxidative stress on viral pathogenesis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-016-3187-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reactive species are frequently formed after viral infections. Antioxidant defences, including enzymatic and non-enzymatic components, protect against reactive species, but sometimes these defences are not completely adequate. An imbalance in the production of reactive species and the body’s inability to detoxify these reactive species is referred to as oxidative stress. The aim of this review is to analyse the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of viral infections and highlight some major therapeutic approaches that have gained importance, with regards to controlling virus-induced oxidative injury. Attention will be focused on DNA viruses (papillomaviruses, hepadnaviruses), RNA viruses (flaviviruses, orthomyxoviruses, paramyxoviruses, togaviruses) and retroviruses (human immunodeficiency virus). In general, viruses cause an imbalance in the cellular redox environment, which depending on the virus and the cell can result in different responses, e.g. cell signaling, antioxidant defences, reactive species, and other processes. Therefore, the modulation of reactive species production and oxidative stress potentially represents a novel pharmacological approach for reducing the consequences of viral pathogenesis.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 30, 2016

References

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