Implications of Aberrant Temperature-Sensitive Glucose Transport Via the Glucose Transporter Deficiency Mutant (GLUT1DS) T295M for the Alternate-Access and Fixed-Site Transport Models

Implications of Aberrant Temperature-Sensitive Glucose Transport Via the Glucose Transporter... In silico glucose docking to the transporter GLUT1 templated to the crystal structure of Escherichia coli XylE, a bacterial homolog of GLUT1–4 (4GBZ.pdb), reveals multiple docking sites. One site in the external vestibule in the exofacial linker between TM7 and -8 is adjacent to a missense T295M and a 4-mer insertion mutation. Glucose docking to the adjacent site is occluded in these mutants. These mutants cause an atypical form of glucose transport deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS), where transport into the brain is deficient, although unusually transport into erythrocytes at 4 °C appears normal. A model in which glucose traverses the transporter via a network of saturable fixed sites simulates the temperature sensitivity of normal and mutant glucose influx and the mutation-dependent alterations of influx and efflux asymmetry when expressed in Xenopus oocytes at 37 °C. The explanation for the temperature sensitivity is that at 4 °C glucose influx between the external and internal vestibules is slow and causes glucose to accumulate in the external vestibule. This retards net glucose uptake from the external solution via two parallel sites into the external vestibule, consequently masking any transport defect at either one of these sites. At 37 °C glucose transit between the external and internal vestibules is rapid, with no significant glucose buildup in the external vestibule, and thereby unmasks any transport defect at one of the parallel input sites. Monitoring glucose transport in patients’ erythrocytes at higher temperatures may improve the diagnostic accuracy of the functional test of GLUT1DS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Implications of Aberrant Temperature-Sensitive Glucose Transport Via the Glucose Transporter Deficiency Mutant (GLUT1DS) T295M for the Alternate-Access and Fixed-Site Transport Models

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/implications-of-aberrant-temperature-sensitive-glucose-transport-via-YFjLJwPx7t
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Human Physiology
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-013-9564-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial