Impact of Residual Soil Nitrate on In-Season Nitrogen Applications to Irrigated Corn Based on Remotely Sensed Assessments of Crop Nitrogen Status

Impact of Residual Soil Nitrate on In-Season Nitrogen Applications to Irrigated Corn Based on... Spatial and temporal variability of soil nitrogen (N) supply together with temporal variability of plant N demand make conventional N management difficult. This study was conducted to determine the impact of residual soil nitrate-N (NO3-N) on ground-based remote sensing management of in-season N fertilizer applications for commercial center-pivot irrigated corn (Zea mays L.) in northeast Colorado. Wedge-shaped areas were established to facilitate fertigation with the center pivot in two areas of the field that had significantly different amounts of residual soil NO3-N in the soil profile. One in-season fertigation (48 kg N ha−1) was required in the Bijou loamy sand soil with high residual NO3-N versus three in-season fertigations totaling 102 kg N ha−1 in the Valentine fine sand soil with low residual NO3-N. The farmer applied five fertigations to the field between the wedges for a total in-season N application of 214 kg N ha−1. Nitrogen input was reduced by 78% and 52%, respectively, in these two areas compared to the farmer’s traditional practice without any reductions in corn yield. The ground-based remote sensing management of in-season applied N increased N use efficiency and significantly reduced residual soil NO3-N (0–1.5 m depth) in the loamy sand soil area. Applying fertilizer N as needed by the crop and where needed in a field may reduce N inputs compared to traditional farmer accepted practices and improve in-season N management. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Impact of Residual Soil Nitrate on In-Season Nitrogen Applications to Irrigated Corn Based on Remotely Sensed Assessments of Crop Nitrogen Status

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/impact-of-residual-soil-nitrate-on-in-season-nitrogen-applications-to-Cm0VC7Eefx
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11119-005-5641-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spatial and temporal variability of soil nitrogen (N) supply together with temporal variability of plant N demand make conventional N management difficult. This study was conducted to determine the impact of residual soil nitrate-N (NO3-N) on ground-based remote sensing management of in-season N fertilizer applications for commercial center-pivot irrigated corn (Zea mays L.) in northeast Colorado. Wedge-shaped areas were established to facilitate fertigation with the center pivot in two areas of the field that had significantly different amounts of residual soil NO3-N in the soil profile. One in-season fertigation (48 kg N ha−1) was required in the Bijou loamy sand soil with high residual NO3-N versus three in-season fertigations totaling 102 kg N ha−1 in the Valentine fine sand soil with low residual NO3-N. The farmer applied five fertigations to the field between the wedges for a total in-season N application of 214 kg N ha−1. Nitrogen input was reduced by 78% and 52%, respectively, in these two areas compared to the farmer’s traditional practice without any reductions in corn yield. The ground-based remote sensing management of in-season applied N increased N use efficiency and significantly reduced residual soil NO3-N (0–1.5 m depth) in the loamy sand soil area. Applying fertilizer N as needed by the crop and where needed in a field may reduce N inputs compared to traditional farmer accepted practices and improve in-season N management.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 22, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off