Impact of formation water on the generation of H2S in condensate reservoirs: a case study from the deep Ordovician in the Tazhong Uplift of the Tarim Basin, NW China

Impact of formation water on the generation of H2S in condensate reservoirs: a case study from... A number of condensate reservoirs with high concentrations of H2S have been discovered in the deep dolomite reservoirs of the lower Ordovician Yingshan Formation (O1y) in the Tazhong Uplift, where the formation water has a high pH value. In the O1y reservoir, the concentrations of Mg2+ and SO4 2− in the formation water are higher than those in the upper Ordovician formation. The concentration of H2S in the condensate reservoirs and the concentration of Mg2+ in the formation water correlate well in the O1y reservoirs of the Tazhong Uplift, which indicates a presumed thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) origin of H2S according to the oxidation theory of contact ion-pairs (CIPs). Besides, the pH values of the formation water are positively correlated with the concentration of H2S in the condensate reservoirs, which may indicate that high pH might be another factor to promote and maintain TSR. Oil–source correlation of biomarkers in the sulfuretted condensates indicates the Cambrian source rocks could be the origin of condensates. The formation water in the condensate reservoirs of O1y is similar to that in the Cambrian; therefore, the TSR of sulfate-CIPs likely occurred in the Cambrian. High H2S-bearing condensates are mainly located near the No. 1 Fault and NE-SW strike-slip faults, which are the major migration pathway of deep fluids in the Tazhong Uplift. The redox between sulfate-CIPs and hydrocarbons is the generation mechanism of H2S in the deep dolomite condensate reservoirs of the Tazhong Uplift. This finding should be helpful to predict the fluid properties of deep dolomite reservoirs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Petroleum Science Springer Journals

Impact of formation water on the generation of H2S in condensate reservoirs: a case study from the deep Ordovician in the Tazhong Uplift of the Tarim Basin, NW China

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/impact-of-formation-water-on-the-generation-of-h2s-in-condensate-iL7BwNdGWR
Publisher
China University of Petroleum (Beijing)
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Earth Sciences; Mineral Resources; Industrial Chemistry/Chemical Engineering; Industrial and Production Engineering; Energy Economics
ISSN
1672-5107
eISSN
1995-8226
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12182-017-0176-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial