Immediate and delayed effects of diurnal temperature drops on growth and reproductive development of tomato plants grown under continuous lighting

Immediate and delayed effects of diurnal temperature drops on growth and reproductive development... Growing tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) under 24-h irradiation at constant temperature results in photoinhibition of the photosynthetic apparatus and light-induced injury of leaves, which is manifested in interveinal chlorosis and has a negative effect on growth and development. At later stages of plant development, the unfavorable influence of continuous lighting (CL) applied during the pre-reproductive period was evident in the delayed flowering, reduced fruit set and yield. In order to eliminate negative consequences of CL, the plants were exposed daily during the pre-reproductive period to temperature drops to 10℃ for 2 h (DROP). Control plants were grown under 16-h photoperiod at 26/20°C (day/night) temperature. By the end of the pre-reproductive period (day 37), DROP-treated and control plants were transplanted to a greenhouse and grown under identical conditions of natural photoperiod throughout the spring-summer season. The application of DROP under CL throughout the pre-reproductive period prevented the appearance of leaf chlorosis, enlarged leaf area, and increased the plant biomass. Furthermore, in DROP-treated plants, no adverse aftereffects of CL were observed in subsequent development. The DROP-treated plants did not differ from control plants in terms of time to flowering, the fruit set and total yield but were superior to control plants with regard to the early fruit yield. It is concluded that the DROP-treatment helps to employ the potential advantages of CL by mitigating its negative effects on plants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Immediate and delayed effects of diurnal temperature drops on growth and reproductive development of tomato plants grown under continuous lighting

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/immediate-and-delayed-effects-of-diurnal-temperature-drops-on-growth-0GD0nZwPul
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Physiology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443715030176
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Growing tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) under 24-h irradiation at constant temperature results in photoinhibition of the photosynthetic apparatus and light-induced injury of leaves, which is manifested in interveinal chlorosis and has a negative effect on growth and development. At later stages of plant development, the unfavorable influence of continuous lighting (CL) applied during the pre-reproductive period was evident in the delayed flowering, reduced fruit set and yield. In order to eliminate negative consequences of CL, the plants were exposed daily during the pre-reproductive period to temperature drops to 10℃ for 2 h (DROP). Control plants were grown under 16-h photoperiod at 26/20°C (day/night) temperature. By the end of the pre-reproductive period (day 37), DROP-treated and control plants were transplanted to a greenhouse and grown under identical conditions of natural photoperiod throughout the spring-summer season. The application of DROP under CL throughout the pre-reproductive period prevented the appearance of leaf chlorosis, enlarged leaf area, and increased the plant biomass. Furthermore, in DROP-treated plants, no adverse aftereffects of CL were observed in subsequent development. The DROP-treated plants did not differ from control plants in terms of time to flowering, the fruit set and total yield but were superior to control plants with regard to the early fruit yield. It is concluded that the DROP-treatment helps to employ the potential advantages of CL by mitigating its negative effects on plants.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 29, 2015

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off