Imaging of an underexpanded nozzle flow by UV laser Rayleigh scattering

Imaging of an underexpanded nozzle flow by UV laser Rayleigh scattering  Rayleigh scattering of ultra-violet laser light is applied as a diagnostic tool to record gas density distributions in a supersonic nozzle flow. The output beam of a pulsed ArF excimer laser (λ=193.4 nm) is focussed into a thin light sheet radially intersecting a dry air flow emanating from a circular nozzle. An intensified CCD camera is used to record the Rayleigh scattered light in a direction perpendicular to the light sheet. Since the Rayleigh scattering intensity is directly proportional to the local gas density, this results in two-dimensional gas density distribution maps of radial slices through the flow. Images of the flow density are presented for stagnation pressures between 0.2 and 0.7 MPa (0.1 MPa ≡1 bar), showing the transition from subsonic to supersonic flow and, at higher pressures, the formation of a Mach disk. Density maps can be recorded with single laser pulses, effectively freezing the flow structure on a 20 ns time scale. The diamond pattern, characteristic for underexpanded supersonic nozzle flows, is quantitatively monitored, with the experimental results being in reasonable agreement with predictions from a simplified theoretical model. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experiments in Fluids Springer Journals

Imaging of an underexpanded nozzle flow by UV laser Rayleigh scattering

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Engineering; Engineering Fluid Dynamics; Fluid- and Aerodynamics; Engineering Thermodynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer
ISSN
0723-4864
eISSN
1432-1114
D.O.I.
10.1007/s003480050156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

 Rayleigh scattering of ultra-violet laser light is applied as a diagnostic tool to record gas density distributions in a supersonic nozzle flow. The output beam of a pulsed ArF excimer laser (λ=193.4 nm) is focussed into a thin light sheet radially intersecting a dry air flow emanating from a circular nozzle. An intensified CCD camera is used to record the Rayleigh scattered light in a direction perpendicular to the light sheet. Since the Rayleigh scattering intensity is directly proportional to the local gas density, this results in two-dimensional gas density distribution maps of radial slices through the flow. Images of the flow density are presented for stagnation pressures between 0.2 and 0.7 MPa (0.1 MPa ≡1 bar), showing the transition from subsonic to supersonic flow and, at higher pressures, the formation of a Mach disk. Density maps can be recorded with single laser pulses, effectively freezing the flow structure on a 20 ns time scale. The diamond pattern, characteristic for underexpanded supersonic nozzle flows, is quantitatively monitored, with the experimental results being in reasonable agreement with predictions from a simplified theoretical model.

Journal

Experiments in FluidsSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 20, 1998

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