Hyperglycemia and aberrant O-GlcNAcylation: contributions to tumor progression

Hyperglycemia and aberrant O-GlcNAcylation: contributions to tumor progression A number of cancer types have shown an increased prevalence and a higher mortality rate in patients with hyperglycemic associated pathologies. Although the correlation between diabetes and cancer incidence has been increasingly reported, the underlying molecular mechanisms beyond this association are not yet fully understood. Recent studies have suggested that high glucose levels support tumor progression through multiple mechanisms that are hallmarks of cancer, including cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, increased cell migration and invasiveness, epigenetic regulation (hyperglycemic memory), resistance to chemotherapy and altered metabolism. Most of the above occur because hyperglycemia through hexosamine biosynthetic pathway leads to aberrant O-GlcNAcylation of many intracellular proteins that are involved in those mechanisms. Deregulated O-GlcNAcylation is emerging as a general feature of cancer. Despite strong evidence suggesting that aberrant O-GlcNAcylation is or may be involved in the acquisition of all cancer hallmarks, it remains out of the list of the next generation of emerging hallmarks. Here, we discuss some of the current understanding on how hyperglycemia affects cancer cell biology and how aberrant O-GlcNAcylation stands in this context. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes Springer Journals

Hyperglycemia and aberrant O-GlcNAcylation: contributions to tumor progression

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Bioorganic Chemistry; Biochemistry, general; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology; Animal Biochemistry; Organic Chemistry
ISSN
0145-479X
eISSN
1573-6881
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10863-017-9740-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A number of cancer types have shown an increased prevalence and a higher mortality rate in patients with hyperglycemic associated pathologies. Although the correlation between diabetes and cancer incidence has been increasingly reported, the underlying molecular mechanisms beyond this association are not yet fully understood. Recent studies have suggested that high glucose levels support tumor progression through multiple mechanisms that are hallmarks of cancer, including cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, increased cell migration and invasiveness, epigenetic regulation (hyperglycemic memory), resistance to chemotherapy and altered metabolism. Most of the above occur because hyperglycemia through hexosamine biosynthetic pathway leads to aberrant O-GlcNAcylation of many intracellular proteins that are involved in those mechanisms. Deregulated O-GlcNAcylation is emerging as a general feature of cancer. Despite strong evidence suggesting that aberrant O-GlcNAcylation is or may be involved in the acquisition of all cancer hallmarks, it remains out of the list of the next generation of emerging hallmarks. Here, we discuss some of the current understanding on how hyperglycemia affects cancer cell biology and how aberrant O-GlcNAcylation stands in this context.

Journal

Journal of Bioenergetics and BiomembranesSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 11, 2018

References

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