Hox genes and animal regeneration

Hox genes and animal regeneration The concept of regeneration is intimately associated with ideas about positional information, that is, the distribution of various signals prescribing cells their location in an embryo or an adult organism. Hox genes are perfect candidates for the role of factors creating positional information. Their main function is thought to be regionalization of the embryo and the determination of the anterior/posterior (A/P) axis of the bilaterian body according to the rules of temporal and spatial colinearity. At the same time, Hox genes are also expressed postembryonically and may participate in various processes in the adult body. In particular, Hox genes are involved in regeneration, as shown on animals from different evolutionary clades. During reparation Hox genes are responsible for regionalization and specification of the newly formed structures, which reflects their embryonic role. This is not all, however. Hox transcription patterns in some adult organisms and their expression dynamics after damage suggest that Hox genes are involved in creating positional information in the adult body. This information is necessary for consistent reparation, while its fast reorganization may accelerate the reparative process. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Developmental Biology Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Developmental Biology; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology
ISSN
1062-3604
eISSN
1608-3326
D.O.I.
10.1134/S106236041604007X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The concept of regeneration is intimately associated with ideas about positional information, that is, the distribution of various signals prescribing cells their location in an embryo or an adult organism. Hox genes are perfect candidates for the role of factors creating positional information. Their main function is thought to be regionalization of the embryo and the determination of the anterior/posterior (A/P) axis of the bilaterian body according to the rules of temporal and spatial colinearity. At the same time, Hox genes are also expressed postembryonically and may participate in various processes in the adult body. In particular, Hox genes are involved in regeneration, as shown on animals from different evolutionary clades. During reparation Hox genes are responsible for regionalization and specification of the newly formed structures, which reflects their embryonic role. This is not all, however. Hox transcription patterns in some adult organisms and their expression dynamics after damage suggest that Hox genes are involved in creating positional information in the adult body. This information is necessary for consistent reparation, while its fast reorganization may accelerate the reparative process.

Journal

Russian Journal of Developmental BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 23, 2016

References

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