How True Is True? Assessing Socially Desirable Response Bias

How True Is True? Assessing Socially Desirable Response Bias Health care professionals' (HCPs) opinions and perspectives are highly valuedbecause these individuals often play a major role in developing and implementingsupport and education services aimed at cancer patients and their families. Thepurpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of adding a substantive measurethat would be useful for determining socially desirable responses (SDRs) withoutadding unnecessary length to the questionnaire design. A total of 1180 nurses,physicians, and social workers specializing in oncology returned fully completedmailed questionnaires (61% response rate) originally intended to measure HCPs'awareness (i.e., knowledge, helpfulness, and recommendations) of cancer supportservices. SDRs were assessed by the inclusion of a bogus program that was comparedto actual support programs. Results indicated that relative to the bogus program, HCPswere significantly more likely to endorse programs that they knew about, thought helpful,and recommended. Evidence of SDR bias was lacking. These findings provide supportfor the inclusion of measures that can be used on brief questionnaires to strengthenresearch methodology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality & Quantity Springer Journals

How True Is True? Assessing Socially Desirable Response Bias

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Methodology of the Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0033-5177
eISSN
1573-7845
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1024420231961
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Health care professionals' (HCPs) opinions and perspectives are highly valuedbecause these individuals often play a major role in developing and implementingsupport and education services aimed at cancer patients and their families. Thepurpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of adding a substantive measurethat would be useful for determining socially desirable responses (SDRs) withoutadding unnecessary length to the questionnaire design. A total of 1180 nurses,physicians, and social workers specializing in oncology returned fully completedmailed questionnaires (61% response rate) originally intended to measure HCPs'awareness (i.e., knowledge, helpfulness, and recommendations) of cancer supportservices. SDRs were assessed by the inclusion of a bogus program that was comparedto actual support programs. Results indicated that relative to the bogus program, HCPswere significantly more likely to endorse programs that they knew about, thought helpful,and recommended. Evidence of SDR bias was lacking. These findings provide supportfor the inclusion of measures that can be used on brief questionnaires to strengthenresearch methodology.

Journal

Quality & QuantitySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 17, 2004

References

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