How important are aquatic predators to mosquito larval populations in natural wetlands? A case study from Carolina bays in Georgia

How important are aquatic predators to mosquito larval populations in natural wetlands? A case... Predation is believed to be an important natural control on larval mosquito populations. However, empirical evidence for predator impacts is lacking, especially from natural wetlands (swamps and marshes). Over a 2-year period, we sampled larval mosquito populations and naturally co-occurring predator assemblages (aquatic invertebrates, fishes) from ten depressional wetlands (Carolina bays) located on a wildlife management area in east central Georgia. We collected a diversity of mosquito larvae and predators (odonates, bugs, beetles, flies, and fishes) from the wetlands, with predator numbers substantially exceeding mosquito larval numbers. However, using a community ecology approach with multivariate ordination and correlation techniques, we found no compelling evidence that these predators were controlling mosquito larval distributions (i.e. significant negative statistical associations were not detected). Those mosquitoes that successfully breed in Carolina bay wetlands (Culiseta melanura, Coquillettidia perturbans, Anopheles crucians) appear well adapted to co-exist with a plethora of naturally occurring predators. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wetlands Ecology and Management Springer Journals

How important are aquatic predators to mosquito larval populations in natural wetlands? A case study from Carolina bays in Georgia

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Conservation Biology/Ecology; Environmental Law/Policy/Ecojustice; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Hydrology/Water Resources; Water Quality/Water Pollution
ISSN
0923-4861
eISSN
1572-9834
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11273-017-9581-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Predation is believed to be an important natural control on larval mosquito populations. However, empirical evidence for predator impacts is lacking, especially from natural wetlands (swamps and marshes). Over a 2-year period, we sampled larval mosquito populations and naturally co-occurring predator assemblages (aquatic invertebrates, fishes) from ten depressional wetlands (Carolina bays) located on a wildlife management area in east central Georgia. We collected a diversity of mosquito larvae and predators (odonates, bugs, beetles, flies, and fishes) from the wetlands, with predator numbers substantially exceeding mosquito larval numbers. However, using a community ecology approach with multivariate ordination and correlation techniques, we found no compelling evidence that these predators were controlling mosquito larval distributions (i.e. significant negative statistical associations were not detected). Those mosquitoes that successfully breed in Carolina bay wetlands (Culiseta melanura, Coquillettidia perturbans, Anopheles crucians) appear well adapted to co-exist with a plethora of naturally occurring predators.

Journal

Wetlands Ecology and ManagementSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 4, 2017

References

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