Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural evidence of spontaneous Senecavirus A-induced lesions at the choroid plexus of newborn piglets

Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural evidence of spontaneous Senecavirus... Epidemic Transient Neonatal Losses (ETNL) is a disease of piglets caused by Senecavirus A (SVA) in which the method of dissemination and associated lesions are not well-defined. This study investigated the possible SVA-induced lesions by examining spontaneous infections in newborn piglets. Histopathology revealed ballooning degeneration of transitional epithelium, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, plexus choroiditis, and atrophic enteritis. RT-PCR identified SVA in all tissues evaluated and sequencing confirmed these results. Positive immunoreactivity to SVA was observed in endothelial and epithelial tissues of all organs evaluated. Semithin analysis revealed vacuolization of apical enterocytes of the small intestine, balloon degeneration and necrosis of endothelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP) and nonsuppurative choroid plexitis. Ultrathin evaluation demonstrated hydropic degeneration of apical enterocytes, degeneration and necrosis of endothelium of CP fenestrated capillaries, degeneration of ependymocytes associated with intralesional viral particles. It is proposed that SVA initially infects apical enterocytes of newborn piglets and probably enters the circulatory system with entry to the brain via the CP, by first producing an initial inflammatory reaction, with subsequent encephalitic dissemination. Consequently, SVA probably uses an enteric-neurological method of dissemination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scientific Reports Springer Journals

Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural evidence of spontaneous Senecavirus A-induced lesions at the choroid plexus of newborn piglets

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
eISSN
2045-2322
D.O.I.
10.1038/s41598-017-16407-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Epidemic Transient Neonatal Losses (ETNL) is a disease of piglets caused by Senecavirus A (SVA) in which the method of dissemination and associated lesions are not well-defined. This study investigated the possible SVA-induced lesions by examining spontaneous infections in newborn piglets. Histopathology revealed ballooning degeneration of transitional epithelium, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, plexus choroiditis, and atrophic enteritis. RT-PCR identified SVA in all tissues evaluated and sequencing confirmed these results. Positive immunoreactivity to SVA was observed in endothelial and epithelial tissues of all organs evaluated. Semithin analysis revealed vacuolization of apical enterocytes of the small intestine, balloon degeneration and necrosis of endothelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP) and nonsuppurative choroid plexitis. Ultrathin evaluation demonstrated hydropic degeneration of apical enterocytes, degeneration and necrosis of endothelium of CP fenestrated capillaries, degeneration of ependymocytes associated with intralesional viral particles. It is proposed that SVA initially infects apical enterocytes of newborn piglets and probably enters the circulatory system with entry to the brain via the CP, by first producing an initial inflammatory reaction, with subsequent encephalitic dissemination. Consequently, SVA probably uses an enteric-neurological method of dissemination.

Journal

Scientific ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 29, 2017

References

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