Helpful devices in microsurgery: an inexpensive self-made microsucker

Helpful devices in microsurgery: an inexpensive self-made microsucker Eur J Plast Surg (2006) 29: 99 DOI 10.1007/s00238-006-0053-2 LETTER TO THE EDITOR . . . A. Daigeler W. Schneider L. Steinstraesser M. Lehnhardt Helpful devices in microsurgery: an inexpensive self-made microsucker Received: 3 October 2005 / Accepted: 14 February 2006 / Published online: 16 May 2006 # Springer-Verlag 2006 Sir: Performing vascular anastomosis in microsurgery requires optimal conditions. To provide a clear operation site and to remove edematous fluids, rinsing solution and blood suction is necessary. Regular-sized suckers usually cannot be handled carefully enough, and there is always the risk of sucking up the vessel ends, thereby possibly damaging the intima. Due to its measures a regular sucker is also disturbing for the operator while he is handling the microinstruments in the small area. Purchasable micro- suckers are expensive, that is why we would like to present a simple, quick, and inexpensive way to fabricate a disposable microsucker. An expendable 2-ml syringe is plugged into a regular suction tube after the syringe piston is removed and the back of the syringe is cut away, and a Fig. 1 Material needed for the microsucker: suction tube, 2-ml small hole is cut or drilled into the syringe cylinder to allow syringe, IV needle pressure equalization and regulation (Fig. 1). Finally, the flexible plastic part of an i.v. needle (the wings can be cut) of any preferred size can be plugged onto the syringe (Fig. 2). With this cheap device subtle suction close to the vessels can be performed without disturbing the workflow and without any risk of damaging the vessels. . . A. Daigeler (*) L. Steinstraesser M. Lehnhardt Department of Plastic Surgery, Burn Center, Hand Surgery, Sarcoma Reference Center, BG-Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr University, Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum, Germany e-mail: adrien.daigeler@rub.de Tel.: +40-234-3026841 Fax: +49-234-3026379 W. Schneider Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Medical Faculty of the Otto-von-Guericke University, Fig. 2 Assembled microsucker with needle wings cut and pressure Magdeburg, Germany equalization hole http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Plastic Surgery Springer Journals

Helpful devices in microsurgery: an inexpensive self-made microsucker

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Plastic Surgery
ISSN
0930-343X
eISSN
1435-0130
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00238-006-0053-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Eur J Plast Surg (2006) 29: 99 DOI 10.1007/s00238-006-0053-2 LETTER TO THE EDITOR . . . A. Daigeler W. Schneider L. Steinstraesser M. Lehnhardt Helpful devices in microsurgery: an inexpensive self-made microsucker Received: 3 October 2005 / Accepted: 14 February 2006 / Published online: 16 May 2006 # Springer-Verlag 2006 Sir: Performing vascular anastomosis in microsurgery requires optimal conditions. To provide a clear operation site and to remove edematous fluids, rinsing solution and blood suction is necessary. Regular-sized suckers usually cannot be handled carefully enough, and there is always the risk of sucking up the vessel ends, thereby possibly damaging the intima. Due to its measures a regular sucker is also disturbing for the operator while he is handling the microinstruments in the small area. Purchasable micro- suckers are expensive, that is why we would like to present a simple, quick, and inexpensive way to fabricate a disposable microsucker. An expendable 2-ml syringe is plugged into a regular suction tube after the syringe piston is removed and the back of the syringe is cut away, and a Fig. 1 Material needed for the microsucker: suction tube, 2-ml small hole is cut or drilled into the syringe cylinder to allow syringe, IV needle pressure equalization and regulation (Fig. 1). Finally, the flexible plastic part of an i.v. needle (the wings can be cut) of any preferred size can be plugged onto the syringe (Fig. 2). With this cheap device subtle suction close to the vessels can be performed without disturbing the workflow and without any risk of damaging the vessels. . . A. Daigeler (*) L. Steinstraesser M. Lehnhardt Department of Plastic Surgery, Burn Center, Hand Surgery, Sarcoma Reference Center, BG-Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr University, Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum, Germany e-mail: adrien.daigeler@rub.de Tel.: +40-234-3026841 Fax: +49-234-3026379 W. Schneider Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Medical Faculty of the Otto-von-Guericke University, Fig. 2 Assembled microsucker with needle wings cut and pressure Magdeburg, Germany equalization hole

Journal

European Journal of Plastic SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2006

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