He's Stealing My Issues! Clinton's Crime Rhetoric and the Dynamics of Issue Ownership

He's Stealing My Issues! Clinton's Crime Rhetoric and the Dynamics of Issue Ownership This research draws from theories of issue ownership and “crafted talk” to propose a way to systematically analyze how political elites use rhetoric to gain a strategic advantage over their opponents. The example described is President Clinton's success in neutralizing the Republican advantage on issues related to crime fighting. This research provides descriptive evidence to support Clinton's success in this endeavor. Moreover, using content analyses of elite attention to crime from 1981 to 2000, the analysis demonstrates that Clinton not only changed the dimension over which the parties discussed crime, from a focus on punishment to one stressing prevention, but also served as an agenda setter for media coverage of crime using this new emphasis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Behavior Springer Journals

He's Stealing My Issues! Clinton's Crime Rhetoric and the Dynamics of Issue Ownership

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Political Science and International Relations; Political Science; Sociology, general
ISSN
0190-9320
eISSN
1573-6687
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:POBE.0000035959.35567.16
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This research draws from theories of issue ownership and “crafted talk” to propose a way to systematically analyze how political elites use rhetoric to gain a strategic advantage over their opponents. The example described is President Clinton's success in neutralizing the Republican advantage on issues related to crime fighting. This research provides descriptive evidence to support Clinton's success in this endeavor. Moreover, using content analyses of elite attention to crime from 1981 to 2000, the analysis demonstrates that Clinton not only changed the dimension over which the parties discussed crime, from a focus on punishment to one stressing prevention, but also served as an agenda setter for media coverage of crime using this new emphasis.

Journal

Political BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2004

References

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