Have the Doors Opened Wider? Trends in Homeownership Rates by Race and Income

Have the Doors Opened Wider? Trends in Homeownership Rates by Race and Income Homeownership among U.S. families increased notably in recent years, from 63 percent in 1989 to 66.2 percent in 1998. This article examines this trend and the factors contributing to it. We find that (1) homeownership rose for all racial, ethnic, and income groups; (2) the differences in homeownership between minority and nonminority families and between middle-income and lower-income families declined significantly; and (3) changes in family-related characteristics explain homeownership trends among only the top two income quintiles. Among the lower two income quintiles, family-related characteristics explain almost none of the increase in homeownership. This pattern suggests that the favorable economic climate of the last decade, changes in mortgage and housing markets, and changes in the regulations governing those markets account for the increase in homeownership among lower-income families. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics Springer Journals

Have the Doors Opened Wider? Trends in Homeownership Rates by Race and Income

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/have-the-doors-opened-wider-trends-in-homeownership-rates-by-race-and-M5nIKBpiJV
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Economics; Regional/Spatial Science; Financial Services
ISSN
0895-5638
eISSN
1573-045X
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1017960321898
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Homeownership among U.S. families increased notably in recent years, from 63 percent in 1989 to 66.2 percent in 1998. This article examines this trend and the factors contributing to it. We find that (1) homeownership rose for all racial, ethnic, and income groups; (2) the differences in homeownership between minority and nonminority families and between middle-income and lower-income families declined significantly; and (3) changes in family-related characteristics explain homeownership trends among only the top two income quintiles. Among the lower two income quintiles, family-related characteristics explain almost none of the increase in homeownership. This pattern suggests that the favorable economic climate of the last decade, changes in mortgage and housing markets, and changes in the regulations governing those markets account for the increase in homeownership among lower-income families.

Journal

The Journal of Real Estate Finance and EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off