Gut Microbiota and Host Juvenile Growth

Gut Microbiota and Host Juvenile Growth Good genes, good food, good friends. That is what parents hope will sustain and nurture the harmonious growth of their children. The impact of the genetic background and nutrition on postnatal growth has been in the spot light for long, but the good friends have come to the scene only recently. Among the good friends perhaps the most crucial ones are those that we are carrying within ourselves. They comprise the trillions of microbes that collectively constitute each individual’s intestinal microbiota. Indeed, recent epidemiological and field studies in humans, supported by extensive experimental data on animal models, demonstrate a clear role of the intestinal microbiota on their host’s juvenile growth, especially under suboptimal nutrient conditions. Genuinely integrative approaches applicable to invertebrate and vertebrate systems combine tools from genetics, developmental biology, microbiology, nutrition, and physiology to reveal how gut microbiota affects growth both positively and negatively, in healthy and pathological conditions. It appears that certain natural or engineered gut microbiota communities can positively impact insulin/IGF-1 and steroid hormone signaling, thus contributing to the host juvenile development and maturation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Calcified Tissue International Springer Journals

Gut Microbiota and Host Juvenile Growth

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/gut-microbiota-and-host-juvenile-growth-QWXrq8WSd3
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Endocrinology; Orthopedics; Cell Biology
ISSN
0171-967X
eISSN
1432-0827
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00223-017-0368-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Good genes, good food, good friends. That is what parents hope will sustain and nurture the harmonious growth of their children. The impact of the genetic background and nutrition on postnatal growth has been in the spot light for long, but the good friends have come to the scene only recently. Among the good friends perhaps the most crucial ones are those that we are carrying within ourselves. They comprise the trillions of microbes that collectively constitute each individual’s intestinal microbiota. Indeed, recent epidemiological and field studies in humans, supported by extensive experimental data on animal models, demonstrate a clear role of the intestinal microbiota on their host’s juvenile growth, especially under suboptimal nutrient conditions. Genuinely integrative approaches applicable to invertebrate and vertebrate systems combine tools from genetics, developmental biology, microbiology, nutrition, and physiology to reveal how gut microbiota affects growth both positively and negatively, in healthy and pathological conditions. It appears that certain natural or engineered gut microbiota communities can positively impact insulin/IGF-1 and steroid hormone signaling, thus contributing to the host juvenile development and maturation.

Journal

Calcified Tissue InternationalSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 6, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off