Growth and mating of southern African Lycoteuthis lorigera (Steenstrup, 1875) (Cephalopoda; Lycoteuthidae)

Growth and mating of southern African Lycoteuthis lorigera (Steenstrup, 1875) (Cephalopoda;... Lycoteuthis lorigera is an oceanic squid that is abundant in the Benguela system. Little is known about the biology of this squid except that it is eaten in large numbers by numerous oceanic predators and that males grow to larger size than females, which is unique for oegopsid squid. The aim of this study was to better understand the biology of this species by investigating its age and growth, as well as its mating system. Toward this end, the age of 110 individuals, ranging from 35 to 110 mm, was estimated by counting statolith growth increments. Estimates of age ranged from 131 to 315 days and varied with mantle length. No significant differences were found in the size of males and females of equivalent ages. The relationship between ML and age for both sexes was best described by an exponential growth curve, probably because no early life stages were aged in this study. Only one mature male (ML 160 mm) was aged, and preliminary estimates suggest it was 386 days old. Instantaneous growth rates were low (0.54% ML/day and 1.4% BM/day) but consistent with enoploteuthid growth rates. When the growth rate of L. lorigera was corrected for temperature encountered during the animal’s life, the growth rate was fast (0.47% BM/degree-days) and consistent with the hypothesis that small cephalopods grow fast and that large cephalopods grow older, rather than fast. Mature females were often mated and had spermatangia in a seminal receptacle on the dorsal pouch behind the nuchal cartilage. Males probably transfer spermatangia to the females using their long second and/or third arm pair since the paired terminal organs open far from the mantle opening. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Growth and mating of southern African Lycoteuthis lorigera (Steenstrup, 1875) (Cephalopoda; Lycoteuthidae)

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-006-9031-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lycoteuthis lorigera is an oceanic squid that is abundant in the Benguela system. Little is known about the biology of this squid except that it is eaten in large numbers by numerous oceanic predators and that males grow to larger size than females, which is unique for oegopsid squid. The aim of this study was to better understand the biology of this species by investigating its age and growth, as well as its mating system. Toward this end, the age of 110 individuals, ranging from 35 to 110 mm, was estimated by counting statolith growth increments. Estimates of age ranged from 131 to 315 days and varied with mantle length. No significant differences were found in the size of males and females of equivalent ages. The relationship between ML and age for both sexes was best described by an exponential growth curve, probably because no early life stages were aged in this study. Only one mature male (ML 160 mm) was aged, and preliminary estimates suggest it was 386 days old. Instantaneous growth rates were low (0.54% ML/day and 1.4% BM/day) but consistent with enoploteuthid growth rates. When the growth rate of L. lorigera was corrected for temperature encountered during the animal’s life, the growth rate was fast (0.47% BM/degree-days) and consistent with the hypothesis that small cephalopods grow fast and that large cephalopods grow older, rather than fast. Mature females were often mated and had spermatangia in a seminal receptacle on the dorsal pouch behind the nuchal cartilage. Males probably transfer spermatangia to the females using their long second and/or third arm pair since the paired terminal organs open far from the mantle opening.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 23, 2006

References

  • Diversity in growth and longevity in short-lived animals: squid of the suborder Oegopsina
    Arkhipkin, AI
  • Identification of ontogenetic growth models of squid
    Arkhipkin, AI; Roa-Ureta, R

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