Going Out on a Limb in an Underdeveloped Branch of Objectification Research

Going Out on a Limb in an Underdeveloped Branch of Objectification Research This paper comments on Heflick and Goldenberg (2010) and examines the evidence cited to support their claim that the objectification of Sarah Palin undermined her performance and voters’ perceptions of her competence. Drawing on evidence related to U.S. media and U.S. political elections, I discuss the conflicting images of Sarah Palin and how they may have contributed to a greater focus on her appearance. I review evidence of how Sarah Palin and other female political candidates have been treated by the media and conclude the evidence for objectification by the media is weak. While the experimental evidence of the objectification of Sarah Palin is intriguing, it does not eliminate plausible alternative explanations for judgments of her competence. Particular attention is paid to the problem of operationally defining objectification, whether in analyses of the media or in laboratory studies. More empirical research on the objectification of others is encouraged, and directions for future experimental research in this area are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Going Out on a Limb in an Underdeveloped Branch of Objectification Research

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/going-out-on-a-limb-in-an-underdeveloped-branch-of-objectification-DjUaJU1BFu
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11199-011-9999-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper comments on Heflick and Goldenberg (2010) and examines the evidence cited to support their claim that the objectification of Sarah Palin undermined her performance and voters’ perceptions of her competence. Drawing on evidence related to U.S. media and U.S. political elections, I discuss the conflicting images of Sarah Palin and how they may have contributed to a greater focus on her appearance. I review evidence of how Sarah Palin and other female political candidates have been treated by the media and conclude the evidence for objectification by the media is weak. While the experimental evidence of the objectification of Sarah Palin is intriguing, it does not eliminate plausible alternative explanations for judgments of her competence. Particular attention is paid to the problem of operationally defining objectification, whether in analyses of the media or in laboratory studies. More empirical research on the objectification of others is encouraged, and directions for future experimental research in this area are discussed.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 23, 2011

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off