Global changes in gene expression, assayed by microarray hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, during acclimation of three Arabidopsis thaliana accessions to sub-zero temperatures after cold acclimation

Global changes in gene expression, assayed by microarray hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR,... During cold acclimation plants increase in freezing tolerance in response to low non-freezing temperatures. This is accompanied by many physiological, biochemical and molecular changes that have been extensively investigated. In addition, plants of many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, become more freezing tolerant during exposure to mild, non-damaging sub-zero temperatures after cold acclimation. There is hardly any information available about the molecular basis of this adaptation. Here, we have used microarrays and a qRT-PCR primer platform covering 1,880 genes encoding transcription factors (TFs) to monitor changes in gene expression in the Arabidopsis accessions Columbia-0, Rschew and Tenela during the first 3 days of sub-zero acclimation at −3 °C. The results indicate that gene expression during sub-zero acclimation follows a tighly controlled time-course. Especially AP2/EREBP and WRKY TFs may be important regulators of sub-zero acclimation, although the CBF signal transduction pathway seems to be less important during sub-zero than during cold acclimation. Globally, we estimate that approximately 5 % of all Arabidopsis genes are regulated during sub-zero acclimation. Particularly photosynthesis-related genes are down-regulated and genes belonging to the functional classes of cell wall biosynthesis, hormone metabolism and RNA regulation of transcription are up-regulated. Collectively, these data provide the first global analysis of gene expression during sub-zero acclimation and allow the identification of candidate genes for forward and reverse genetic studies into the molecular mechanisms of sub-zero acclimation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Global changes in gene expression, assayed by microarray hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, during acclimation of three Arabidopsis thaliana accessions to sub-zero temperatures after cold acclimation

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-014-0256-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During cold acclimation plants increase in freezing tolerance in response to low non-freezing temperatures. This is accompanied by many physiological, biochemical and molecular changes that have been extensively investigated. In addition, plants of many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, become more freezing tolerant during exposure to mild, non-damaging sub-zero temperatures after cold acclimation. There is hardly any information available about the molecular basis of this adaptation. Here, we have used microarrays and a qRT-PCR primer platform covering 1,880 genes encoding transcription factors (TFs) to monitor changes in gene expression in the Arabidopsis accessions Columbia-0, Rschew and Tenela during the first 3 days of sub-zero acclimation at −3 °C. The results indicate that gene expression during sub-zero acclimation follows a tighly controlled time-course. Especially AP2/EREBP and WRKY TFs may be important regulators of sub-zero acclimation, although the CBF signal transduction pathway seems to be less important during sub-zero than during cold acclimation. Globally, we estimate that approximately 5 % of all Arabidopsis genes are regulated during sub-zero acclimation. Particularly photosynthesis-related genes are down-regulated and genes belonging to the functional classes of cell wall biosynthesis, hormone metabolism and RNA regulation of transcription are up-regulated. Collectively, these data provide the first global analysis of gene expression during sub-zero acclimation and allow the identification of candidate genes for forward and reverse genetic studies into the molecular mechanisms of sub-zero acclimation.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 14, 2014

References

  • Disruption of the Arabidopsis circadian clock is responsible for extensive variation in the cold-responsive transcriptome
    Bieniawska, Z; Espinoza, C; Schlereth, A; Sulpice, R; Hincha, DK; Hannah, MA
  • Real-time RT-PCR profiling of over 1400 Arabidopsis transcription factors: unprecedented sensitivity reveals novel root- and shoot-specific genes
    Czechowski, T; Bari, R; Stitt, M; Scheible, W-R; Udvardi, M
  • Genome-wide identification and testing of superior reference genes for transcript normalization in Arabidopsis
    Czechowski, T; Stitt, M; Altmann, T; Udvardi, MK; Scheible, W-R
  • Arabidopsis transcriptome profiling indicates that multiple regulatory pathways are activated during cold acclimation in addition to the CBF cold response pathway
    Fowler, S; Thomashow, MF
  • Metabolomics of temperature stress
    Guy, CL; Kaplan, F; Kopka, J; Selbig, J; Hincha, DK
  • Transcription factor CBF4 is a regulator of drought adaptation in Arabidopsis
    Haake, V; Cooke, D; Riechmann, JL; Pineda, O; Thomashow, MF; Zhang, JZ
  • Natural genetic variation of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis
    Hannah, MA; Wiese, D; Freund, S; Fiehn, O; Heyer, AG; Hincha, DK

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