Ginseng plantations threaten China’s forests

Ginseng plantations threaten China’s forests Biodivers Conserv (2018) 27:2093–2095 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-018-1530-1 LETTER TO THE EDITOR 1 1 1 1 1 Liang‑Jun Hu  · Zhenxing Zhang  · Weina Wang  · Lu Wang  · Haijun Yang Received: 2 January 2018 / Revised: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published online: 24 February 2018 © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018 To the Editor, Chinese ginseng, Panax ginseng (Fig.  1), originally grown indigenous to the Changbai Mountains where China borders upon the Korean Peninsula, is a popular herbal medicinal plant with world renown and mysterious healing powers especially known in the Orient (Briskin 2000; Choi 2008; Jia et  al. 2009; Lee and Kim 2014). Therefore, being a best- seller cash-herb welcomed throughout the world, China’s ginseng contributes over 70% in amount to the world’s ginseng production (Zhao and Jin 2009); and one third of China’s ginseng yields, i.e., about 1500–1800 tons annually, goes export for earning cash. Yet, this seeming prosperity might be disaster to the local forest protection. Over decades to date, ginseng production has become a compelling challenge that threatens the local forests, bio- diversity and environmental conservation. In general, three kinds of activities account for China’s ginseng provisioning to markets: (i) Wild collections. This time-honored method http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biodiversity and Conservation Springer Journals

Ginseng plantations threaten China’s forests

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/ginseng-plantations-threaten-china-s-forests-AJsFUJoo9n
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Biodiversity; Ecology; Conservation Biology/Ecology; Climate Change/Climate Change Impacts
ISSN
0960-3115
eISSN
1572-9710
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10531-018-1530-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Biodivers Conserv (2018) 27:2093–2095 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-018-1530-1 LETTER TO THE EDITOR 1 1 1 1 1 Liang‑Jun Hu  · Zhenxing Zhang  · Weina Wang  · Lu Wang  · Haijun Yang Received: 2 January 2018 / Revised: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published online: 24 February 2018 © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018 To the Editor, Chinese ginseng, Panax ginseng (Fig.  1), originally grown indigenous to the Changbai Mountains where China borders upon the Korean Peninsula, is a popular herbal medicinal plant with world renown and mysterious healing powers especially known in the Orient (Briskin 2000; Choi 2008; Jia et  al. 2009; Lee and Kim 2014). Therefore, being a best- seller cash-herb welcomed throughout the world, China’s ginseng contributes over 70% in amount to the world’s ginseng production (Zhao and Jin 2009); and one third of China’s ginseng yields, i.e., about 1500–1800 tons annually, goes export for earning cash. Yet, this seeming prosperity might be disaster to the local forest protection. Over decades to date, ginseng production has become a compelling challenge that threatens the local forests, bio- diversity and environmental conservation. In general, three kinds of activities account for China’s ginseng provisioning to markets: (i) Wild collections. This time-honored method

Journal

Biodiversity and ConservationSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 24, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off