Germline Mutations of Tetranucleotide DNA Repeats in Families with Normal Children and Reproductive Pathology

Germline Mutations of Tetranucleotide DNA Repeats in Families with Normal Children and... We have previously reported a high rate of tetranucleotide DNA repeat mutations, including mutations of both germline and somatic origin, in spontaneous human abortions. To analyze in more detail mutational microsatellite (MS) variability in meiosis and its possible association with disturbed embryonic development, we have conducted a comparative study of mutation rates of a panel of 15 autosomal tetranucleotide MSs in 55 families with healthy children and in 103 families that have had spontaneous abortions with normal karyotypes. In the families with miscarriage, the gametic MS mutation rate was higher than in the families with normal reproductive function (4.36 × 10−3 versus 2.32 × 10−3 per locus per gamete per generation), but this difference was statistically nonsignificant (P = 0.25). No association of MS mutations with familiar miscarriage was found. Mutations at the MS loci studied were recorded almost 3 times as often in spermatogenesis as in oogenesis, which is likely to result from a greater number of DNA replication cycles in male germline cell precursors than in female ones. Mutations increasing and reducing the MS sequence length appeared at virtually the same rate. Changes in MS DNA sequence length per one repeated element, i.e., single-step mutations (93% of cases) exceeded all other events of allele length change. The highest number of mutations (81.2%) was found in longer alleles. This distribution of mutations by size, direction, and parental origin corresponds to the multistep mutation model of their emergence via mechanism of DNA strand slippage during replication. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Germline Mutations of Tetranucleotide DNA Repeats in Families with Normal Children and Reproductive Pathology

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/germline-mutations-of-tetranucleotide-dna-repeats-in-families-with-9j6XSLgWnx
Publisher
Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Biomedicine; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11177-005-0159-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We have previously reported a high rate of tetranucleotide DNA repeat mutations, including mutations of both germline and somatic origin, in spontaneous human abortions. To analyze in more detail mutational microsatellite (MS) variability in meiosis and its possible association with disturbed embryonic development, we have conducted a comparative study of mutation rates of a panel of 15 autosomal tetranucleotide MSs in 55 families with healthy children and in 103 families that have had spontaneous abortions with normal karyotypes. In the families with miscarriage, the gametic MS mutation rate was higher than in the families with normal reproductive function (4.36 × 10−3 versus 2.32 × 10−3 per locus per gamete per generation), but this difference was statistically nonsignificant (P = 0.25). No association of MS mutations with familiar miscarriage was found. Mutations at the MS loci studied were recorded almost 3 times as often in spermatogenesis as in oogenesis, which is likely to result from a greater number of DNA replication cycles in male germline cell precursors than in female ones. Mutations increasing and reducing the MS sequence length appeared at virtually the same rate. Changes in MS DNA sequence length per one repeated element, i.e., single-step mutations (93% of cases) exceeded all other events of allele length change. The highest number of mutations (81.2%) was found in longer alleles. This distribution of mutations by size, direction, and parental origin corresponds to the multistep mutation model of their emergence via mechanism of DNA strand slippage during replication.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 9, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off