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Geographic and seasonal patterns of seabird subsistence harvest in Alaska

Geographic and seasonal patterns of seabird subsistence harvest in Alaska Assessing seabird harvest sustainability is difficult because of limited information on harvest and on harvest impacts on seabird populations. This study quantified seasonal harvest of seabirds and their eggs in all Alaska regions, addressed management and conservation questions, and identified topics where collaboration among stakeholders can support sustainable harvest opportunities and promote seabird conservation. In 2002–2015, the estimated subsistence harvest of seabirds was 24,315 birds/year. Murres (33%), auklets (28%), gulls (16%), and cormorants (14%) represented most of the harvest. Alaska-wide harvest patterns largely reflected harvest at the St. Lawrence–Diomede Islands, which represented 78% of the total seabird harvest. The Alaska-wide seasonal distribution of harvest was 56% in spring, 20% summer, and 24% fall-winter. The estimated egg harvest was 150,781 eggs/year and was largely composed of murres (51%) and gulls (45%) eggs. Harvest of most species, including species of conservation concern, was low relative to population sizes. However, harvest of eggs of terns may be significant compared to coastal egg productivity. A better understanding of threats to populations of terns is needed to clarify conservation priorities and to engage subsistence users in conservation efforts. Despite indications of reduced subsistence uses, harvesting of seabirds and their eggs remains culturally important and is a food security component in remote communities in Alaska. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Polar Biology Springer Journals

Geographic and seasonal patterns of seabird subsistence harvest in Alaska

Polar Biology , Volume 41 (6) – Feb 9, 2018

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References (81)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Oceanography; Microbiology; Plant Sciences; Zoology
ISSN
0722-4060
eISSN
1432-2056
DOI
10.1007/s00300-018-2279-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Assessing seabird harvest sustainability is difficult because of limited information on harvest and on harvest impacts on seabird populations. This study quantified seasonal harvest of seabirds and their eggs in all Alaska regions, addressed management and conservation questions, and identified topics where collaboration among stakeholders can support sustainable harvest opportunities and promote seabird conservation. In 2002–2015, the estimated subsistence harvest of seabirds was 24,315 birds/year. Murres (33%), auklets (28%), gulls (16%), and cormorants (14%) represented most of the harvest. Alaska-wide harvest patterns largely reflected harvest at the St. Lawrence–Diomede Islands, which represented 78% of the total seabird harvest. The Alaska-wide seasonal distribution of harvest was 56% in spring, 20% summer, and 24% fall-winter. The estimated egg harvest was 150,781 eggs/year and was largely composed of murres (51%) and gulls (45%) eggs. Harvest of most species, including species of conservation concern, was low relative to population sizes. However, harvest of eggs of terns may be significant compared to coastal egg productivity. A better understanding of threats to populations of terns is needed to clarify conservation priorities and to engage subsistence users in conservation efforts. Despite indications of reduced subsistence uses, harvesting of seabirds and their eggs remains culturally important and is a food security component in remote communities in Alaska.

Journal

Polar BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 9, 2018

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