Genetics, Homeownership, and Home Location Choice

Genetics, Homeownership, and Home Location Choice We find that a significant proportion of the cross-sectional variation in the choice to own or rent is attributable to a genetic factor, while parental influence is not found to affect this choice. We also find evidence of gene-environment interactions: The environment moderates genetic effects on homeownership in that growing up in a wealthier family results in a stronger expression of genetic predispositions, while idiosyncratic life experiences appear to explain a larger portion of the variation in homeownership among those who grew up in a less wealthy family environment. Furthermore, we find that home location choices, for example, a familiar home location close to one’s birthplace and an urban versus a rural home location, are explained by both genetic factors and parental influence. Because we control for an extensive set of individual characteristics analyzed in existing research, an interpretation of our evidence is that an individual’s preferences with respect to homeownership and home location are partly genetic. The findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the factors that explain individual behavior with respect to the housing market, and add to an expanding literature on the biological and genetic factors that influence individuals’ economic and financial decisions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics Springer Journals

Genetics, Homeownership, and Home Location Choice

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/genetics-homeownership-and-home-location-choice-xG0RORPAZA
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Economics / Management Science; Regional/Spatial Science; Finance/Investment/Banking
ISSN
0895-5638
eISSN
1573-045X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11146-012-9373-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We find that a significant proportion of the cross-sectional variation in the choice to own or rent is attributable to a genetic factor, while parental influence is not found to affect this choice. We also find evidence of gene-environment interactions: The environment moderates genetic effects on homeownership in that growing up in a wealthier family results in a stronger expression of genetic predispositions, while idiosyncratic life experiences appear to explain a larger portion of the variation in homeownership among those who grew up in a less wealthy family environment. Furthermore, we find that home location choices, for example, a familiar home location close to one’s birthplace and an urban versus a rural home location, are explained by both genetic factors and parental influence. Because we control for an extensive set of individual characteristics analyzed in existing research, an interpretation of our evidence is that an individual’s preferences with respect to homeownership and home location are partly genetic. The findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the factors that explain individual behavior with respect to the housing market, and add to an expanding literature on the biological and genetic factors that influence individuals’ economic and financial decisions.

Journal

The Journal of Real Estate Finance and EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2012

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off