Genetic population structure in flatfishes and potential impact of aquaculture and stock enhancement on wild populations in Europe

Genetic population structure in flatfishes and potential impact of aquaculture and stock... Marine fish wild stocks are known to be heavily depleted by overfishing and flatfish species are no exception. Wild catches being soon insufficient for responding to consumer demand, the cultivation of marine species appeared as a logical response to the need of seafood. Nevertheless, fish aquaculture also entails major impacts on wild populations from which genetic ones are now better known. The hybridization between domestic and native strains potentially have a genetic impact on recipient populations as long as 1) domestic populations are distinct from native wild ones (through domestication process, genetic improvement of captive stocks) and/or 2) the native wild populations are structured (metapopulation structure, local adaptation). Some of the flatfish species exhibit population differentiation and even local adaptation and the release of domestic genetically modified fishes (selected, transgenic) could threaten their survival in case of introgression. The impact of aquaculture on flatfishes is probably still low as land-based farms and low production levels guaranty low rates of escapes and therefore limited contacts between wild and farmed strains. However, flatfish aquaculture is regarded by experts as a rapidly growing domain that will greatly develop soon. In our opinion, this perspective, added to the quite good performances of farmed flatfishes when released into the wild, fully justifies a stronger interest from the scientific community to the conservation of their wild stocks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Genetic population structure in flatfishes and potential impact of aquaculture and stock enhancement on wild populations in Europe

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-011-9198-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Marine fish wild stocks are known to be heavily depleted by overfishing and flatfish species are no exception. Wild catches being soon insufficient for responding to consumer demand, the cultivation of marine species appeared as a logical response to the need of seafood. Nevertheless, fish aquaculture also entails major impacts on wild populations from which genetic ones are now better known. The hybridization between domestic and native strains potentially have a genetic impact on recipient populations as long as 1) domestic populations are distinct from native wild ones (through domestication process, genetic improvement of captive stocks) and/or 2) the native wild populations are structured (metapopulation structure, local adaptation). Some of the flatfish species exhibit population differentiation and even local adaptation and the release of domestic genetically modified fishes (selected, transgenic) could threaten their survival in case of introgression. The impact of aquaculture on flatfishes is probably still low as land-based farms and low production levels guaranty low rates of escapes and therefore limited contacts between wild and farmed strains. However, flatfish aquaculture is regarded by experts as a rapidly growing domain that will greatly develop soon. In our opinion, this perspective, added to the quite good performances of farmed flatfishes when released into the wild, fully justifies a stronger interest from the scientific community to the conservation of their wild stocks.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 2011

References

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