Genetic engineering of algal chloroplasts: Progress and prospects

Genetic engineering of algal chloroplasts: Progress and prospects The last few years has seen an ever-increasing interest in the exploitation of microalgae as recombinant platforms for the synthesis of novel bioproducts. These could be biofuel molecules, speciality enzymes, nutraceuticals, or therapeutic proteins, such as antibodies, hormones, and vaccines. This exploitation requires the development of new genetic engineering technologies for those fast-growing, robust species suited for intensive commercial cultivation in bioreactor systems. In particular, there is a need for routine methods for the genetic manipulation of the chloroplast genome, for two reasons: firstly, the chloroplast genetic system is well-suited to the targeted insertion into the genome and high-level expression of foreign genes; secondly, the organelle is the site of numerous biosynthetic pathways and therefore represents the obvious “chassis,” on which to bolt new metabolic pathways that divert the carbon fixed by photosynthesis into novel hydrocarbons, pigments, etc. Stable transformation of the algal chloroplast was first demonstrated in 1988, using the model chlorophyte, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Since that time, tremendous advances have been made in the development of sophisticated tools for engineering this particular species, and efforts to transfer this technology to other commercially attractive species are starting to bear fruit. In this article, we review the current field of algal chloroplast transgenics and consider the prospects for the future. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Genetic engineering of algal chloroplasts: Progress and prospects

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Physiology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443713040146
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The last few years has seen an ever-increasing interest in the exploitation of microalgae as recombinant platforms for the synthesis of novel bioproducts. These could be biofuel molecules, speciality enzymes, nutraceuticals, or therapeutic proteins, such as antibodies, hormones, and vaccines. This exploitation requires the development of new genetic engineering technologies for those fast-growing, robust species suited for intensive commercial cultivation in bioreactor systems. In particular, there is a need for routine methods for the genetic manipulation of the chloroplast genome, for two reasons: firstly, the chloroplast genetic system is well-suited to the targeted insertion into the genome and high-level expression of foreign genes; secondly, the organelle is the site of numerous biosynthetic pathways and therefore represents the obvious “chassis,” on which to bolt new metabolic pathways that divert the carbon fixed by photosynthesis into novel hydrocarbons, pigments, etc. Stable transformation of the algal chloroplast was first demonstrated in 1988, using the model chlorophyte, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Since that time, tremendous advances have been made in the development of sophisticated tools for engineering this particular species, and efforts to transfer this technology to other commercially attractive species are starting to bear fruit. In this article, we review the current field of algal chloroplast transgenics and consider the prospects for the future.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 18, 2013

References

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