Genetic Contribution to Suicidal Behaviors and Associated Risk Factors among Adolescents in the U.S.

Genetic Contribution to Suicidal Behaviors and Associated Risk Factors among Adolescents in the U.S. This paper examines genetic contribution to suicidal behaviors and other risk factors associated with suicidal behavior among adolescents in the U.S. Using adolescent twin data in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N=1448), we compared concordance in suicidal ideation and attempt among monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins. Heritability of risk factors for suicidal behaviors also was examined using Pearson correlation and mixed-model analyses. A trend of higher concordance in suicidal ideation and attempt was found among MZ than DZ twins but the difference was not statistically significant by the stringent test of bootstrapping analysis. Evidence of heritability was found for several suicide risk factors. The percentage of variance explained by heritability was larger among female twins for depression, aggression, and quantity of cigarettes smoked in comparison to heritability estimates for male twins. However, estimated heritability was larger among male than female twins for alcohol use and binge drinking. Heritability influence was negligible among both sexes for other drug use. Risk factors for suicidal behaviors among adolescents may be heritable. Gender differences found in the heritability of some suicide risk factors suggest these genetic contributions are gender specific. Future research examining potential interactions between expression of genetic influence and particular environmental contexts may enhance prevention and intervention efforts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prevention Science Springer Journals

Genetic Contribution to Suicidal Behaviors and Associated Risk Factors among Adolescents in the U.S.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/genetic-contribution-to-suicidal-behaviors-and-associated-risk-factors-D9uDLoI9qz
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Society for Prevention Research
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Health Psychology; Child and School Psychology
ISSN
1389-4986
eISSN
1573-6695
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11121-006-0042-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper examines genetic contribution to suicidal behaviors and other risk factors associated with suicidal behavior among adolescents in the U.S. Using adolescent twin data in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N=1448), we compared concordance in suicidal ideation and attempt among monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins. Heritability of risk factors for suicidal behaviors also was examined using Pearson correlation and mixed-model analyses. A trend of higher concordance in suicidal ideation and attempt was found among MZ than DZ twins but the difference was not statistically significant by the stringent test of bootstrapping analysis. Evidence of heritability was found for several suicide risk factors. The percentage of variance explained by heritability was larger among female twins for depression, aggression, and quantity of cigarettes smoked in comparison to heritability estimates for male twins. However, estimated heritability was larger among male than female twins for alcohol use and binge drinking. Heritability influence was negligible among both sexes for other drug use. Risk factors for suicidal behaviors among adolescents may be heritable. Gender differences found in the heritability of some suicide risk factors suggest these genetic contributions are gender specific. Future research examining potential interactions between expression of genetic influence and particular environmental contexts may enhance prevention and intervention efforts.

Journal

Prevention ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 8, 2006

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off