Genetic comparison between laboratory rats and Japanese and German wild rats

Genetic comparison between laboratory rats and Japanese and German wild rats Short Communications Incorporating Mouse Genome Mammalian Genome 11, 789–790 (2000). © Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2000 DOI: 10.1007/s003350010137 Genetic comparison between laboratory rats and Japanese and German wild rats 1 1 2 1 Birger Voigt, Kazuhiro Kitada, Ingrid Klo ¨ ting, Tadao Serikawa Institute of Laboratory Animals, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 Japan Department of Laboratory Animal Science, Institute of Pathophysiology, University of Greifswald, Karlsburg 17495, Germany Received: 29 February 2000 / Accepted: 10 April 2000 The history of the rat as a laboratory animal began in the 1850s. Table 1. Percentage of markers that showed new alleles. Researchers from France (Philpeaux 1856), England (Savory Strain MITB MITC MITE HR2 G3 RU1 1863), and Germany (Crampe 1877) pioneered the use of rats as experimental animals. However, the beginning of rat breeding for % New 33 31 31 48 45 45 scientific purposes can be traced to North America, as virtually all MITB, MITC, and MITE refer to Japanese Mitake strains B, C, and E; HR2, G3, and inbred rat strains in the world today may attribute their ancestry to RU1 indicate individual wild German rats. stocks in the United States. The Wistar rats, which were brought http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Genetic comparison between laboratory rats and Japanese and German wild rats

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Anatomy; Zoology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s003350010137
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Short Communications Incorporating Mouse Genome Mammalian Genome 11, 789–790 (2000). © Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2000 DOI: 10.1007/s003350010137 Genetic comparison between laboratory rats and Japanese and German wild rats 1 1 2 1 Birger Voigt, Kazuhiro Kitada, Ingrid Klo ¨ ting, Tadao Serikawa Institute of Laboratory Animals, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 Japan Department of Laboratory Animal Science, Institute of Pathophysiology, University of Greifswald, Karlsburg 17495, Germany Received: 29 February 2000 / Accepted: 10 April 2000 The history of the rat as a laboratory animal began in the 1850s. Table 1. Percentage of markers that showed new alleles. Researchers from France (Philpeaux 1856), England (Savory Strain MITB MITC MITE HR2 G3 RU1 1863), and Germany (Crampe 1877) pioneered the use of rats as experimental animals. However, the beginning of rat breeding for % New 33 31 31 48 45 45 scientific purposes can be traced to North America, as virtually all MITB, MITC, and MITE refer to Japanese Mitake strains B, C, and E; HR2, G3, and inbred rat strains in the world today may attribute their ancestry to RU1 indicate individual wild German rats. stocks in the United States. The Wistar rats, which were brought

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 13, 2014

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