Genetic characterization of rotavirus in children in South Korea from 2007 to 2009

Genetic characterization of rotavirus in children in South Korea from 2007 to 2009 Rotavirus is the most important etiological agent in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE). The recent implementation of a rotavirus vaccine in Korea requires the monitoring of prevailing rotavirus strains in order to control the infection. One hundred thirty-nine rotavirus strains were detected in children hospitalized with AGE in Seoul, Korea from 2007 to 2009. The most frequent combination of genotypes was G9P(8) (32.1%), followed by G1P(8) (20.7%) and G3P(8) (11.7%). Mixed G-types were detected in 14 samples (10.0%), and mixed P-types were found in six samples (4.3%). G9 genotypes were predominant from 2007 to 2008, whereas G1 and G3 genotypes were predominant from 2008 to 2009. G1 strains clustered mostly in the Id lineage, and some clustered in the Ic, IId, and Ia lineages. G2 strains clustered in the IV and V lineages. G3 and G9 strains clustered in the IIId and Id lineages, respectively. This study shows a rapid change of the prevalent genotype from G9 to G1 and G3 genotypes, suggesting that continuous surveillance of rotavirus strains is important for rotavirus vaccination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Genetic characterization of rotavirus in children in South Korea from 2007 to 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/genetic-characterization-of-rotavirus-in-children-in-south-korea-from-jDlePRYwVk
Publisher
Springer Vienna
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Infectious Diseases; Medical Microbiology ; Virology
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-010-0752-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rotavirus is the most important etiological agent in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE). The recent implementation of a rotavirus vaccine in Korea requires the monitoring of prevailing rotavirus strains in order to control the infection. One hundred thirty-nine rotavirus strains were detected in children hospitalized with AGE in Seoul, Korea from 2007 to 2009. The most frequent combination of genotypes was G9P(8) (32.1%), followed by G1P(8) (20.7%) and G3P(8) (11.7%). Mixed G-types were detected in 14 samples (10.0%), and mixed P-types were found in six samples (4.3%). G9 genotypes were predominant from 2007 to 2008, whereas G1 and G3 genotypes were predominant from 2008 to 2009. G1 strains clustered mostly in the Id lineage, and some clustered in the Ic, IId, and Ia lineages. G2 strains clustered in the IV and V lineages. G3 and G9 strains clustered in the IIId and Id lineages, respectively. This study shows a rapid change of the prevalent genotype from G9 to G1 and G3 genotypes, suggesting that continuous surveillance of rotavirus strains is important for rotavirus vaccination.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 1, 2010

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off