G-POEM for Gastroparesis: Is There Pressure to Go with the Flow?

G-POEM for Gastroparesis: Is There Pressure to Go with the Flow? Digestive Diseases and Sciences (2018) 63:2165–2167 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-018-5116-2 EDITORIAL 1 1 Allen A. Lee  · William L. Hasler Published online: 31 May 2018 © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018 Distressing symptoms such as post-prandial nausea, bloat- Grading Assessment Score (CPGAS). Nonetheless, several ing, a sense of fullness, and vomiting are associated with items require closer examination. First, these subjects almost the syndrome of gastroparesis, a condition associated with all had mild symptoms at baseline with an average Gastro- abnormal retention of food and fluid in the stomach. A sub - paresis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) score of 2.1, even set of gastroparesis patients have “pyloropasm”, initially though they were labeled as “refractory gastroparesis” by described by Mearin et al. [1] as abnormally prolonged, the authors. It is unclear why the authors used the validated high-amplitude pyloric contractions in a 1986 study of 14 Patient Assessment of Gastrointestinal Disorders-Symptom of 24 diabetic patients with nausea and vomiting. Follow- Severity Index (PAGI-SYM) survey as their baseline ques- ing publication of this study, the contribution of the pylorus tionnaire and CPGAS as their primary therapeutic endpoint. to symptoms and gastric emptying delays in gastroparesis GCSI, a 9-item questionnaire contained within PAGI-SYM, has been the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Digestive Diseases and Sciences Springer Journals

G-POEM for Gastroparesis: Is There Pressure to Go with the Flow?

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Gastroenterology; Hepatology; Oncology; Transplant Surgery; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0163-2116
eISSN
1573-2568
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10620-018-5116-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Digestive Diseases and Sciences (2018) 63:2165–2167 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-018-5116-2 EDITORIAL 1 1 Allen A. Lee  · William L. Hasler Published online: 31 May 2018 © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018 Distressing symptoms such as post-prandial nausea, bloat- Grading Assessment Score (CPGAS). Nonetheless, several ing, a sense of fullness, and vomiting are associated with items require closer examination. First, these subjects almost the syndrome of gastroparesis, a condition associated with all had mild symptoms at baseline with an average Gastro- abnormal retention of food and fluid in the stomach. A sub - paresis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) score of 2.1, even set of gastroparesis patients have “pyloropasm”, initially though they were labeled as “refractory gastroparesis” by described by Mearin et al. [1] as abnormally prolonged, the authors. It is unclear why the authors used the validated high-amplitude pyloric contractions in a 1986 study of 14 Patient Assessment of Gastrointestinal Disorders-Symptom of 24 diabetic patients with nausea and vomiting. Follow- Severity Index (PAGI-SYM) survey as their baseline ques- ing publication of this study, the contribution of the pylorus tionnaire and CPGAS as their primary therapeutic endpoint. to symptoms and gastric emptying delays in gastroparesis GCSI, a 9-item questionnaire contained within PAGI-SYM, has been the

Journal

Digestive Diseases and SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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